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snapshot: Social Imaginaries and Global Realities

snapshot: Social Imaginaries and Global Realities inflect discussion, and engage decision makers. The understandings of the social imaginary being formulated can counter or confirm ideas already circulating in public discussion; they can generate a sense of the optional or the opposites in a given debate; they can provide substance to subjects emerging in the public sphere. Precisely when opinion is dynamic and change is occurring, there is the need for multiple influences, myriad interpretations, and ideas in the making. In short, there are times when we cannot wait for scholarship to be finished. Charles Taylor (2002), the Canadian philosopher, uses the term new social imaginary for this work that is under way. For him, the social imaginary is the thinking shared within a society by ordinary people, the common understanding that makes common practices possible and legitimizes them. The social imaginary is implicit and normative; it derives from the usual, the quotidian, from everyday attitudes, behaviors, and opinion making. It flows from events and ideas, the realities that citizens live with most intimately and immediately. In Taylor’s words, the social imaginary provides the background that makes sense of any given act in daily life. More importantly, as he writes, the social imaginary carries within http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Public Culture Duke University Press

snapshot: Social Imaginaries and Global Realities

Public Culture , Volume 15 (3) – Oct 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0899-2363
eISSN
1527-8018
DOI
10.1215/08992363-15-3-579
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

inflect discussion, and engage decision makers. The understandings of the social imaginary being formulated can counter or confirm ideas already circulating in public discussion; they can generate a sense of the optional or the opposites in a given debate; they can provide substance to subjects emerging in the public sphere. Precisely when opinion is dynamic and change is occurring, there is the need for multiple influences, myriad interpretations, and ideas in the making. In short, there are times when we cannot wait for scholarship to be finished. Charles Taylor (2002), the Canadian philosopher, uses the term new social imaginary for this work that is under way. For him, the social imaginary is the thinking shared within a society by ordinary people, the common understanding that makes common practices possible and legitimizes them. The social imaginary is implicit and normative; it derives from the usual, the quotidian, from everyday attitudes, behaviors, and opinion making. It flows from events and ideas, the realities that citizens live with most intimately and immediately. In Taylor’s words, the social imaginary provides the background that makes sense of any given act in daily life. More importantly, as he writes, the social imaginary carries within

Journal

Public CultureDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2003

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