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Skidelsky on Keynes: A Review Essay

Skidelsky on Keynes: A Review Essay History of Political Economy 34:3 (2002) has the three periods running 10.5, 14.4, and 27.3. From these numbers, it would seem that the historian’s larger scale that Skidelsky claims as an advantage (3:xviii) only kicks in after 1920—and with a vengeance, after 1936. The three-volume format, with long temporal gaps between the volumes, has also led to recapitulations in the early parts of volumes 2 and 3 as Skidelsky tries to bring his readers, some of whom may not have read or may have forgotten some of the previous volumes, up to speed. Writing a biography of someone as multifaceted as Keynes requires wide knowledge. Naturally, it helps to know something about economics and its development since the middle of the nineteenth century, but one also needs to know about the development of probability theory up to the 1930s; the institutional history of the University of Cambridge over that same period; the governmental arrangements for India before 1947; British financial policy, both domestic and international, between 1900 and 1945; the development of liberal thought in the first half of the twentieth century; British foreign policy between 1914 and 1946; and domestic political developments, particularly as they affected the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Political Economy Duke University Press

Skidelsky on Keynes: A Review Essay

History of Political Economy , Volume 34 (3) – Sep 1, 2002

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2702
eISSN
1527-1919
DOI
10.1215/00182702-34-3-633
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

History of Political Economy 34:3 (2002) has the three periods running 10.5, 14.4, and 27.3. From these numbers, it would seem that the historian’s larger scale that Skidelsky claims as an advantage (3:xviii) only kicks in after 1920—and with a vengeance, after 1936. The three-volume format, with long temporal gaps between the volumes, has also led to recapitulations in the early parts of volumes 2 and 3 as Skidelsky tries to bring his readers, some of whom may not have read or may have forgotten some of the previous volumes, up to speed. Writing a biography of someone as multifaceted as Keynes requires wide knowledge. Naturally, it helps to know something about economics and its development since the middle of the nineteenth century, but one also needs to know about the development of probability theory up to the 1930s; the institutional history of the University of Cambridge over that same period; the governmental arrangements for India before 1947; British financial policy, both domestic and international, between 1900 and 1945; the development of liberal thought in the first half of the twentieth century; British foreign policy between 1914 and 1946; and domestic political developments, particularly as they affected the

Journal

History of Political EconomyDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2002

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