Shakespeare, Geography, and the Work of Genre on the Early Modern Stage

Shakespeare, Geography, and the Work of Genre on the Early Modern Stage This essay has been previously published, in Japanese, in Shakespeare across the Centuries, ed. Shakespeare Society of Japan (Tokyo: Kenkyusha, 2002), 241–75. I am grateful to the Shakespeare Society of Japan for its kind invitation to address the membership and for the occasion it afforded me to prepare this essay. 1 Jodi Mikalachki, describing King Lear as Shakespeare’s “tragedy of British prehistor y,” makes a compelling argument that it dramatizes “a period before civilization” (The Legacy of Boadicea: Gender and Nation in Early Modern England [London: Routledge, 1998], 70, 71). The only other exceptions to the general rule that Shakespeare’s tragedies are set outside England are his tragic histories such as Richard III and Richard II. As I will discuss later in this essay, they are generically double, falling within the rubrics both of English histor y and of tragedy. Modern Language Quarterly 64:3, September 2003. © 2003 University of Washington. MLQ September 2003 Is the pattern of locating tragedy outside England unique to Shakespeare? Is it of critical signi cance, or just a random curiosity? In attempting to answer these questions, I meditate in what follows on the links among genre, geography, and the class and gender http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modern Language Quarterly: A Journal of Literary History Duke University Press

Shakespeare, Geography, and the Work of Genre on the Early Modern Stage

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by University of Washington
ISSN
0026-7929
eISSN
1527-1943
D.O.I.
10.1215/00267929-64-3-299
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This essay has been previously published, in Japanese, in Shakespeare across the Centuries, ed. Shakespeare Society of Japan (Tokyo: Kenkyusha, 2002), 241–75. I am grateful to the Shakespeare Society of Japan for its kind invitation to address the membership and for the occasion it afforded me to prepare this essay. 1 Jodi Mikalachki, describing King Lear as Shakespeare’s “tragedy of British prehistor y,” makes a compelling argument that it dramatizes “a period before civilization” (The Legacy of Boadicea: Gender and Nation in Early Modern England [London: Routledge, 1998], 70, 71). The only other exceptions to the general rule that Shakespeare’s tragedies are set outside England are his tragic histories such as Richard III and Richard II. As I will discuss later in this essay, they are generically double, falling within the rubrics both of English histor y and of tragedy. Modern Language Quarterly 64:3, September 2003. © 2003 University of Washington. MLQ September 2003 Is the pattern of locating tragedy outside England unique to Shakespeare? Is it of critical signi cance, or just a random curiosity? In attempting to answer these questions, I meditate in what follows on the links among genre, geography, and the class and gender

Journal

Modern Language Quarterly: A Journal of Literary HistoryDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2003

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