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Sex Machine: Global Hypermasculinity and Images of the Asian Woman in Modernity

Sex Machine: Global Hypermasculinity and Images of the Asian Woman in Modernity 1999 by Duke University Press. positions 7:2 Fall 1999 tiple, layered, and malleable. One facet of identity that typifies this is aglobal hypermasculinity that is currently permeating the world political economy. In East Asia especially, this is dispersed through and disguised as modernization and internationalization.3 Under the rubric of globalization, local and global media (backed by state and corporate capital, respectively) naturalize hypermasculinity as part and parcel of the economic development of manly states and manly firms. Confirmed in this is a deepening of the globalist bias. In addition to a valorization of openness, globalization carries with it an association of capitalintensive, upwardly mobile hypermasculinity. This is opposed to an implicitly closed, localized, service-based, and socially regressive hyperfemininity. Hypermasculinity’s promise and its appeal lie partly in its easy application to diverse contexts where it-and such notions as the manly state and the be grounded in entrenched traditions of the patriar“bull market”-can chal household. At the same time, hypermasculinity cracks with internal contradictions as it pushes for greater and more intensive competition, often for the same (and thereby proportionately shrinking) objects of desire. Furthermore, by its very nature, global hypermasculinity contains “the Other” within. To demonstrate, I focus here http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Sex Machine: Global Hypermasculinity and Images of the Asian Woman in Modernity

positions asia critique , Volume 7 (2) – Sep 1, 1999

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-7-2-277
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1999 by Duke University Press. positions 7:2 Fall 1999 tiple, layered, and malleable. One facet of identity that typifies this is aglobal hypermasculinity that is currently permeating the world political economy. In East Asia especially, this is dispersed through and disguised as modernization and internationalization.3 Under the rubric of globalization, local and global media (backed by state and corporate capital, respectively) naturalize hypermasculinity as part and parcel of the economic development of manly states and manly firms. Confirmed in this is a deepening of the globalist bias. In addition to a valorization of openness, globalization carries with it an association of capitalintensive, upwardly mobile hypermasculinity. This is opposed to an implicitly closed, localized, service-based, and socially regressive hyperfemininity. Hypermasculinity’s promise and its appeal lie partly in its easy application to diverse contexts where it-and such notions as the manly state and the be grounded in entrenched traditions of the patriar“bull market”-can chal household. At the same time, hypermasculinity cracks with internal contradictions as it pushes for greater and more intensive competition, often for the same (and thereby proportionately shrinking) objects of desire. Furthermore, by its very nature, global hypermasculinity contains “the Other” within. To demonstrate, I focus here

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1999

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