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"SETT OUT VERRY EAIRLY WENSDY": THE SPELLING AND GRAMMAR IN THE LEWIS AND CLARK JOURNALS

"SETT OUT VERRY EAIRLY WENSDY": THE SPELLING AND GRAMMAR IN THE LEWIS AND CLARK JOURNALS second section also included citations of words in the journals that predate those in the OED. Our method involved collecting the spelling and grammatical data from comparable portions of each of the aforementioned journals, while noting all repetitions and corrections (repetitions are marked with an asterisk).2 We picked the dates 14 May to 20 August 1804 in order to maximize the use of all of the journals, since Sergeant Charles Floyd died on 20 August 1804, only three months into the expedition, from what current medical opinion believes was a ruptured appendix and the resulting peritonitis. Our corpus is based almost wholly on Moulton (1983) for those three months, with selected additional passages from Stephen E. Ambrose’s 1996 best-selling history, Undaunted Courage.3 Our corpus contains over 2,000 spelling and grammatical entries, including multiple variant spellings of the same word. Of all the journalists, Lewis, Thomas Jefferson’s secretary, was the most educated. Clark, although an army officer and a company commander, was only somewhat more educated than his sergeants. Sergeants, as noncommissioned officers, had to be able to read and write because of recordkeeping duties they performed. The overall attitude of previous scholars is a bemused “What can one http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic Usage Duke University Press

"SETT OUT VERRY EAIRLY WENSDY": THE SPELLING AND GRAMMAR IN THE LEWIS AND CLARK JOURNALS

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by American Dialect Society
ISSN
0003-1283
eISSN
1527-2133
DOI
10.1215/00031283-75-2-137
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

second section also included citations of words in the journals that predate those in the OED. Our method involved collecting the spelling and grammatical data from comparable portions of each of the aforementioned journals, while noting all repetitions and corrections (repetitions are marked with an asterisk).2 We picked the dates 14 May to 20 August 1804 in order to maximize the use of all of the journals, since Sergeant Charles Floyd died on 20 August 1804, only three months into the expedition, from what current medical opinion believes was a ruptured appendix and the resulting peritonitis. Our corpus is based almost wholly on Moulton (1983) for those three months, with selected additional passages from Stephen E. Ambrose’s 1996 best-selling history, Undaunted Courage.3 Our corpus contains over 2,000 spelling and grammatical entries, including multiple variant spellings of the same word. Of all the journalists, Lewis, Thomas Jefferson’s secretary, was the most educated. Clark, although an army officer and a company commander, was only somewhat more educated than his sergeants. Sergeants, as noncommissioned officers, had to be able to read and write because of recordkeeping duties they performed. The overall attitude of previous scholars is a bemused “What can one

Journal

American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic UsageDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2000

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