Rhetoricians, Facilitators, Models: Interviews with Technology Trainers

Rhetoricians, Facilitators, Models: Interviews with Technology Trainers Rhetoricians, Facilitators, Models Interviews with Technology Trainers Michelle Sidler At the turn of the millennium, the humanities have become concerned with the ways that computer technologies shape texts and culture (Haraway 1991; Lanham 1995; Landow 1997; Bolter and Grusin 2000). Reflecting this interest, research indicates that a large number of humanities programs, especially those in English, are implementing curricula with formal technological components (Anderson et al. 2006). In the latter decades of the twentieth century, computerized instruction was most prominent among those teaching composition and technical communication,1 but increasingly, all courses in the humanities benefit from engagement with electronic research and communication tools. Although not all humanities faculty embrace computer classrooms, most recognize the value of technology as a teaching tool and support its implementation. As technology becomes more evident in education and the wider culture, effective faculty training is necessary to ensure quality computer-assisted instruction in all subject areas. However, little research in the humanities has tried to identify and describe current faculty development programs or offer practical advice and wisdom from experienced teacher trainers. A notable exception is the Kairos piece “Administering Teacher Technology Training” by Teena Carnegie, Amy Kimme Hea, Melinda Turnley, and David Menchaca http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture Duke University Press

Rhetoricians, Facilitators, Models: Interviews with Technology Trainers

Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture, Volume 8 (3) – Oct 1, 2008

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
© 2008 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1531-4200
eISSN
1531-4200
DOI
10.1215/15314200-2008-006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rhetoricians, Facilitators, Models Interviews with Technology Trainers Michelle Sidler At the turn of the millennium, the humanities have become concerned with the ways that computer technologies shape texts and culture (Haraway 1991; Lanham 1995; Landow 1997; Bolter and Grusin 2000). Reflecting this interest, research indicates that a large number of humanities programs, especially those in English, are implementing curricula with formal technological components (Anderson et al. 2006). In the latter decades of the twentieth century, computerized instruction was most prominent among those teaching composition and technical communication,1 but increasingly, all courses in the humanities benefit from engagement with electronic research and communication tools. Although not all humanities faculty embrace computer classrooms, most recognize the value of technology as a teaching tool and support its implementation. As technology becomes more evident in education and the wider culture, effective faculty training is necessary to ensure quality computer-assisted instruction in all subject areas. However, little research in the humanities has tried to identify and describe current faculty development programs or offer practical advice and wisdom from experienced teacher trainers. A notable exception is the Kairos piece “Administering Teacher Technology Training” by Teena Carnegie, Amy Kimme Hea, Melinda Turnley, and David Menchaca

Journal

Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and CultureDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2008

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