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RESPONSE TO KIRK HAZEN'S REVIEW OF SONJA L. LANEHART'S SOCIOCULTURAL AND HISTORICAL CONTEXTS OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ENGLISH

RESPONSE TO KIRK HAZEN'S REVIEW OF SONJA L. LANEHART'S SOCIOCULTURAL AND HISTORICAL CONTEXTS OF... 1. How can recent research advance the discussion of the AAE/creole relationship? (Sutcliffe) 2. What is the relationship between AAE and other American English dialects? (Bailey and Cukor-Avila) 3. What is the role of AAE in Hip Hop? (Morgan) 4. What can we say about gender and AAE? (Troutman) 5. What is the role of AAE in the African American community? (Morgan, Mufwene, Spears, Troutman, and Zeigler) 6. What is the role of AAE in education? (Baugh, Foster, Labov, and Spears) 7. What can we say about the acquisition and maintenance of AAE? (Baugh, Morgan, and Wyatt) 8. How does AAE serve as a resource for the African American community? (Morgan, Spears, and Zeigler) 9. How can we conceptualize the study of AAE in broader terms? (Mufwene and Wolfram) American Speech, Vol. 79, No. 2, Summer 2004 Copyright © 2004 by the American Dialect Society Hazen’s review, unfortunately, does not adequately reflect the intent, content, or scope of Lanehart (2001). Worse, at several points it misrepresents what is stated. For example, he contends that “Sutcliffe claims that AAE is a tone language, a typological claim unattested in the phonological account of AAE in the chapter by Guy Bailey” http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic Usage Duke University Press

RESPONSE TO KIRK HAZEN'S REVIEW OF SONJA L. LANEHART'S SOCIOCULTURAL AND HISTORICAL CONTEXTS OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ENGLISH

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by American Dialect Society
ISSN
0003-1283
eISSN
1527-2133
DOI
10.1215/00031283-79-2-201
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1. How can recent research advance the discussion of the AAE/creole relationship? (Sutcliffe) 2. What is the relationship between AAE and other American English dialects? (Bailey and Cukor-Avila) 3. What is the role of AAE in Hip Hop? (Morgan) 4. What can we say about gender and AAE? (Troutman) 5. What is the role of AAE in the African American community? (Morgan, Mufwene, Spears, Troutman, and Zeigler) 6. What is the role of AAE in education? (Baugh, Foster, Labov, and Spears) 7. What can we say about the acquisition and maintenance of AAE? (Baugh, Morgan, and Wyatt) 8. How does AAE serve as a resource for the African American community? (Morgan, Spears, and Zeigler) 9. How can we conceptualize the study of AAE in broader terms? (Mufwene and Wolfram) American Speech, Vol. 79, No. 2, Summer 2004 Copyright © 2004 by the American Dialect Society Hazen’s review, unfortunately, does not adequately reflect the intent, content, or scope of Lanehart (2001). Worse, at several points it misrepresents what is stated. For example, he contends that “Sutcliffe claims that AAE is a tone language, a typological claim unattested in the phonological account of AAE in the chapter by Guy Bailey”

Journal

American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic UsageDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2004

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