Respond Now! E-mail, Acceleration, and a Pedagogy of Patience

Respond Now! E-mail, Acceleration, and a Pedagogy of Patience Although commentators have observed and, to varying extents, decried the increasing velocity of contemporary life, the implications of this acceleration of modern culture for effective pedagogy have received virtually no scrutiny. How and when does learning take place in a society “where it becomes nearly impossible to think a thought that is more than a couple inches long” and in which “the unhindered and massive flow of information . . . is about to fi ll all the gaps” (Erikson 2001: vii, 2)? How does responsible pedagogy address new habits of thought that emerge from the compression of time and space and the expectation that everyone should be available all the time? What is the pedagogical response to the speeding up of contemporary life? It seems imperative to consider pedagogical practice in light of such seismic shifts in the lived experience of culture. At the forefront of this increasing velocity of the world is e-mail, a mode of communication that allows for the near instantaneous transmission of information and seems to demand near instantaneous response. Given the ubiquity of e-mail in contemporary culture and the fact that students and faculty today do a substantial amount of work and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture Duke University Press

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1531-4200
eISSN
1533-6255
D.O.I.
10.1215/15314200-4-3-365
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although commentators have observed and, to varying extents, decried the increasing velocity of contemporary life, the implications of this acceleration of modern culture for effective pedagogy have received virtually no scrutiny. How and when does learning take place in a society “where it becomes nearly impossible to think a thought that is more than a couple inches long” and in which “the unhindered and massive flow of information . . . is about to fi ll all the gaps” (Erikson 2001: vii, 2)? How does responsible pedagogy address new habits of thought that emerge from the compression of time and space and the expectation that everyone should be available all the time? What is the pedagogical response to the speeding up of contemporary life? It seems imperative to consider pedagogical practice in light of such seismic shifts in the lived experience of culture. At the forefront of this increasing velocity of the world is e-mail, a mode of communication that allows for the near instantaneous transmission of information and seems to demand near instantaneous response. Given the ubiquity of e-mail in contemporary culture and the fact that students and faculty today do a substantial amount of work and

Journal

Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and CultureDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2004

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