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Republican Friendship: Manuela Saenz Writes Women into the Nation, 1835-1856

Republican Friendship: Manuela Saenz Writes Women into the Nation, 1835-1856 Page 225 Republican Friendship: Manuela Sáenz Writes Women into the Nation, 1835 –1856 Sarah C. Chambers Manuela Sáenz has not suffered the fate of many women throughout history: she has not been forgotten. But the image of her that has lived on, for all its vivid color, is strangely flat. She is remembered as the lover of Simón Bolívar, the renowned leader of South America’s independence from Spain.1 Novels and biographies alike depict her as the passionate beauty to whom Bolívar wrote, “I also want to see you, and examine you and touch you and feel you and savor you and unite you to me through all my senses.”2 Her passions extended into the public sphere, where she dramatically defended the image of This article is an expanded version of a paper presented at a conference entitled “Re-Thinking Nationalisms: Women’s Writings of Resistance and Accommodation in the Modern Period” at the Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona in November 1996. I would like to thank Asunción Lavrin, John C. Chasteen, Nancy Appelbaum, Mary J. Maynes, Lisa Norling, Sylvia Hoffert, Nancy Hewitt, members of the Comparative Women’s History Workshop and Early American History Workshop at the University of Minnesota, and the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hispanic American Historical Review Duke University Press

Republican Friendship: Manuela Saenz Writes Women into the Nation, 1835-1856

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2168
eISSN
1527-1900
DOI
10.1215/00182168-81-2-225
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Page 225 Republican Friendship: Manuela Sáenz Writes Women into the Nation, 1835 –1856 Sarah C. Chambers Manuela Sáenz has not suffered the fate of many women throughout history: she has not been forgotten. But the image of her that has lived on, for all its vivid color, is strangely flat. She is remembered as the lover of Simón Bolívar, the renowned leader of South America’s independence from Spain.1 Novels and biographies alike depict her as the passionate beauty to whom Bolívar wrote, “I also want to see you, and examine you and touch you and feel you and savor you and unite you to me through all my senses.”2 Her passions extended into the public sphere, where she dramatically defended the image of This article is an expanded version of a paper presented at a conference entitled “Re-Thinking Nationalisms: Women’s Writings of Resistance and Accommodation in the Modern Period” at the Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona in November 1996. I would like to thank Asunción Lavrin, John C. Chasteen, Nancy Appelbaum, Mary J. Maynes, Lisa Norling, Sylvia Hoffert, Nancy Hewitt, members of the Comparative Women’s History Workshop and Early American History Workshop at the University of Minnesota, and the

Journal

Hispanic American Historical ReviewDuke University Press

Published: May 1, 2001

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