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Queering Necropolitics across Borders

Queering Necropolitics across Borders Queer Necropolitics Jin Haritaworn, Adi Kuntsman, and Silvia Posocco, editors. New York: Routledge, 2014. xviii + 216 pp. Over the last two decades, LGBTIQ activism, and particularly gay and lesbian identity politics in the global North, has increasingly achieved inclusion within institutions like marriage and the military. A prominent body of scholarship in queer and feminist studies has interrogated the costs of this inclusion, deploying concepts such as homonormativity and homonationalism that critique the ascendance of privileged queer subjects within late liberal regimes of rights and representation and attendant investments in nationalism, militarization, and imperialism.1 In this context, this anthology, edited by Jin Haritaworn, Adi Kuntsman, and Silvia Posocco, brings together scholars from diverse scholarly and activist backgrounds who use the analytical framework of necropolitics to demonstrate how the ascendance of some queer subjects becomes tied to the continuing or renewed forms of disposability, death, and abandonment for others, and thus to illuminate the symbiotic relations between fostering life and the (re)distribution of death that characterize late liberalism (20). Departing from the "distinction between queers folded into life, and those destined for death" (7), the editors draw on Achille Mbembe's influential theorization of necropolitics as a "concept-metaphor" to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies Duke University Press

Queering Necropolitics across Borders

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Duke Univ Press
ISSN
1064-2684
eISSN
1527-9375
DOI
10.1215/10642684-3123749
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Queer Necropolitics Jin Haritaworn, Adi Kuntsman, and Silvia Posocco, editors. New York: Routledge, 2014. xviii + 216 pp. Over the last two decades, LGBTIQ activism, and particularly gay and lesbian identity politics in the global North, has increasingly achieved inclusion within institutions like marriage and the military. A prominent body of scholarship in queer and feminist studies has interrogated the costs of this inclusion, deploying concepts such as homonormativity and homonationalism that critique the ascendance of privileged queer subjects within late liberal regimes of rights and representation and attendant investments in nationalism, militarization, and imperialism.1 In this context, this anthology, edited by Jin Haritaworn, Adi Kuntsman, and Silvia Posocco, brings together scholars from diverse scholarly and activist backgrounds who use the analytical framework of necropolitics to demonstrate how the ascendance of some queer subjects becomes tied to the continuing or renewed forms of disposability, death, and abandonment for others, and thus to illuminate the symbiotic relations between fostering life and the (re)distribution of death that characterize late liberalism (20). Departing from the "distinction between queers folded into life, and those destined for death" (7), the editors draw on Achille Mbembe's influential theorization of necropolitics as a "concept-metaphor" to

Journal

GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2015

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