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Promoting a Just Wage Economy

Promoting a Just Wage Economy Dan Graff Catholic social teaching (CST) is the church’s best- kept secret.” That is a common complaint among progressives, Catholic or otherwise, who lament the eclipse of the church’s antipoverty, pro- labor, and community development emphases by a narrowly den fi ed politics- of- life agenda over the past four decades. It is also something I hear regularly at the University of Notre Dame, where I teach US labor history, introduc- ing students each semester to CST’s critique of unbridled capitalism, support for the dignity of work and those who perform it, and endorsement of the rights of work- ers to participate fully in their economic lives. My colleagues and I at Notre Dame’s Center for Social Concerns (CSC), the heart of community- based engagement at this Catholic university in South Bend, Indiana, are doing our best to make sure CST is a secret no more. I direct the CSC’s Higgins Labor Program, an interdisciplinary unit of diverse faculty, students, and staff exploring the past, present, and future of work and work- ers through the lens of CST. Named for noted twentieth- century labor priest and economist George Higgins, who toiled tirelessly for the cause of workers’ rights and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Labor Duke University Press

Promoting a Just Wage Economy

Labor , Volume 16 (3) – Sep 1, 2019

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Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Labor and Working-Class History Association
ISSN
1547-6715
eISSN
1558-1454
DOI
10.1215/15476715-7569764
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dan Graff Catholic social teaching (CST) is the church’s best- kept secret.” That is a common complaint among progressives, Catholic or otherwise, who lament the eclipse of the church’s antipoverty, pro- labor, and community development emphases by a narrowly den fi ed politics- of- life agenda over the past four decades. It is also something I hear regularly at the University of Notre Dame, where I teach US labor history, introduc- ing students each semester to CST’s critique of unbridled capitalism, support for the dignity of work and those who perform it, and endorsement of the rights of work- ers to participate fully in their economic lives. My colleagues and I at Notre Dame’s Center for Social Concerns (CSC), the heart of community- based engagement at this Catholic university in South Bend, Indiana, are doing our best to make sure CST is a secret no more. I direct the CSC’s Higgins Labor Program, an interdisciplinary unit of diverse faculty, students, and staff exploring the past, present, and future of work and work- ers through the lens of CST. Named for noted twentieth- century labor priest and economist George Higgins, who toiled tirelessly for the cause of workers’ rights and

Journal

LaborDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2019

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