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Progress, Comparison, and the Nature of Literary History: Or, Notes from the Children’s Table

Progress, Comparison, and the Nature of Literary History: Or, Notes from the Children’s Table • • David Lurie Progress, Comparison, and the Nature of Literary History Kitabkhana 1 55 PROGRESS, COMPARISON, AND THE NATURE OF ancillary aids for the uninitiated reader. Of course LITER ARY HISTORY publications aimed at specialist audiences are an essential part of modern humanistic scholarship, or, Notes from the Children’s Table David Lurie and given the massive size of this volume, it is un- derstandable that the editors would choose not to When I was young, holiday dinners had unequal bulk it up further with explanations that would, seating: one long table for the grownups and a I concede, be superfluous for most of its readers. And yet I cannot help wondering what this project smaller satellite table for the children. The chil- dren’s table became progressively less appealing might have been like if all of us had been invited to sit at the same table. to its older members, who felt their subordina- tion keenly and cocked ears toward the often only . . . half- understood conversation of the adults at the other end of the room. As a nonspecialist, read- In 1900 Arthur A. Macdonell wrote that ing this volume — Yigal Bronner, David Shulman, nearly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East Duke University Press

Progress, Comparison, and the Nature of Literary History: Or, Notes from the Children’s Table

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Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Duke University Press
ISSN
1089-201X
eISSN
1548-226X
DOI
10.1215/1089201x-4390087
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

• • David Lurie Progress, Comparison, and the Nature of Literary History Kitabkhana 1 55 PROGRESS, COMPARISON, AND THE NATURE OF ancillary aids for the uninitiated reader. Of course LITER ARY HISTORY publications aimed at specialist audiences are an essential part of modern humanistic scholarship, or, Notes from the Children’s Table David Lurie and given the massive size of this volume, it is un- derstandable that the editors would choose not to When I was young, holiday dinners had unequal bulk it up further with explanations that would, seating: one long table for the grownups and a I concede, be superfluous for most of its readers. And yet I cannot help wondering what this project smaller satellite table for the children. The chil- dren’s table became progressively less appealing might have been like if all of us had been invited to sit at the same table. to its older members, who felt their subordina- tion keenly and cocked ears toward the often only . . . half- understood conversation of the adults at the other end of the room. As a nonspecialist, read- In 1900 Arthur A. Macdonell wrote that ing this volume — Yigal Bronner, David Shulman, nearly

Journal

Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle EastDuke University Press

Published: May 1, 2018

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