Principles of Scientific Management: Selecting the Ideal Worker

Principles of Scientific Management: Selecting the Ideal Worker D AN DO E UM NT The Quota Paul Krehbiel Author’s note: This article, adapted from a more extended memoir, is about a shop-floor campaign to stop management from raising a work quota. In a gss factory in Buffalo in 1968, my coworkers and I pnned and carried out the campaign. Writing in the firstperson narrative style, I have used some literary license for dramatic purposes and changed some names to protect the privacy of individuals involved. I heard rumbling in the distance that sounded like military jeeps on a cobblestone street. The heavy door swung open in front of me and loud crashing and banging noises assaulted my ears. Dragonlike machines spit fire. Bck and green pipes and hoses crisscrossed everywhere, hissing like coiled cobras. The once-white walls looked like old teeth, coated in a yellowish-brown film after years of smoking. My nostrils sucked in the stink of sulfur and other sickening smells. I had stepped into another world. The worst part was the mist. It came from the beveling department. It created a fog in the air and had fine, ground-up gss in it. After three or four hours in that department, it felt like someone http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas Duke University Press

Principles of Scientific Management: Selecting the Ideal Worker

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2005 by Labor and Working-Class History Association
ISSN
1547-6715
eISSN
1558-1454
DOI
10.1215/15476715-2-4-39
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

D AN DO E UM NT The Quota Paul Krehbiel Author’s note: This article, adapted from a more extended memoir, is about a shop-floor campaign to stop management from raising a work quota. In a gss factory in Buffalo in 1968, my coworkers and I pnned and carried out the campaign. Writing in the firstperson narrative style, I have used some literary license for dramatic purposes and changed some names to protect the privacy of individuals involved. I heard rumbling in the distance that sounded like military jeeps on a cobblestone street. The heavy door swung open in front of me and loud crashing and banging noises assaulted my ears. Dragonlike machines spit fire. Bck and green pipes and hoses crisscrossed everywhere, hissing like coiled cobras. The once-white walls looked like old teeth, coated in a yellowish-brown film after years of smoking. My nostrils sucked in the stink of sulfur and other sickening smells. I had stepped into another world. The worst part was the mist. It came from the beveling department. It created a fog in the air and had fine, ground-up gss in it. After three or four hours in that department, it felt like someone

Journal

Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the AmericasDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2005

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