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Preface: Literature and Science: Cultural Forms, Conceptual Exchanges

Preface: Literature and Science: Cultural Forms, Conceptual Exchanges conversations and collaborations, all born of the necessity to address the growing entanglement of culture, technology, and science. As our cover art suggests, science can quite literally generate new art forms that at once register and promote new conceptual exchanges across and within traditional disciplines. We do not argue in this special issue that there is a revolution in the making. Sociologist of science Steven Shapin reminds us that the word revolution is not neutral, that to speak of a revolution is to subscribe to the absoluteness of ‘‘a radical and irreversible reordering developed together with linear, unidirectional conceptions of time.’’ 2 This unidirectionality can be contested. Rather than putting the sciences and the humanities in linear narratives, we have tried to keep in mind that they are both language systems and that the problem of translating from one language to another merits renewed and ongoing attention. We depart from Shapin in focusing less on the social genealogies of science than on the current intersections among the disciplines, intersections productive of large-scale changes across the entire institutional landscape.3 This volume grows out of our commitment to that project. The questions that motivated our call for papers are both http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Literature Duke University Press

Preface: Literature and Science: Cultural Forms, Conceptual Exchanges

American Literature , Volume 74 (4) – Dec 1, 2002

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0002-9831
eISSN
1527-2117
DOI
10.1215/00029831-74-4-705
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

conversations and collaborations, all born of the necessity to address the growing entanglement of culture, technology, and science. As our cover art suggests, science can quite literally generate new art forms that at once register and promote new conceptual exchanges across and within traditional disciplines. We do not argue in this special issue that there is a revolution in the making. Sociologist of science Steven Shapin reminds us that the word revolution is not neutral, that to speak of a revolution is to subscribe to the absoluteness of ‘‘a radical and irreversible reordering developed together with linear, unidirectional conceptions of time.’’ 2 This unidirectionality can be contested. Rather than putting the sciences and the humanities in linear narratives, we have tried to keep in mind that they are both language systems and that the problem of translating from one language to another merits renewed and ongoing attention. We depart from Shapin in focusing less on the social genealogies of science than on the current intersections among the disciplines, intersections productive of large-scale changes across the entire institutional landscape.3 This volume grows out of our commitment to that project. The questions that motivated our call for papers are both

Journal

American LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2002

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