Powerlessness Grows Out of the Barrel of a Gun

Powerlessness Grows Out of the Barrel of a Gun Page 124 REFLECTIONS AND REPORTS Vijay Prashad I heard about 9/11 from my sister-in-law, who called and said that something terrible had just happened. Without cable television and with only intermittent Web gazing during the morning, I may have spent the day in beautiful Northampton, Massachusetts, oblivious to the clash of fundamentalisms, to another episode of McJihad.1 But the contradictions intervened, and I sat down and wrote a brief piece called “Nothing Good Comes from Terror.” The short note, which went out on the Internet from ZNET that evening, ended with the following words: The attacks must be condemned without reservation. But we must be certain to recognize that these are probably the work of frustrated and alienated human beings hemmed in by forces that are anonymous and that could only be embodied by these structures. The people who work in them became the “collateral damage” that we hear so much about when our cruise missiles strike the Third World. Those who died are martyrs of this government’s insane policies, as well as martyrs of the insanity of neoliberal globalization. Even as I typed those words, I was thinking of one of my favorite figures from our past, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Radical History Review Duke University Press

Powerlessness Grows Out of the Barrel of a Gun

Radical History Review, Volume 2003 (85) – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by MARHO: The Radical Historians' Organization, Inc.
ISSN
0163-6545
eISSN
1534-1453
DOI
10.1215/01636545-2003-85-124
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Page 124 REFLECTIONS AND REPORTS Vijay Prashad I heard about 9/11 from my sister-in-law, who called and said that something terrible had just happened. Without cable television and with only intermittent Web gazing during the morning, I may have spent the day in beautiful Northampton, Massachusetts, oblivious to the clash of fundamentalisms, to another episode of McJihad.1 But the contradictions intervened, and I sat down and wrote a brief piece called “Nothing Good Comes from Terror.” The short note, which went out on the Internet from ZNET that evening, ended with the following words: The attacks must be condemned without reservation. But we must be certain to recognize that these are probably the work of frustrated and alienated human beings hemmed in by forces that are anonymous and that could only be embodied by these structures. The people who work in them became the “collateral damage” that we hear so much about when our cruise missiles strike the Third World. Those who died are martyrs of this government’s insane policies, as well as martyrs of the insanity of neoliberal globalization. Even as I typed those words, I was thinking of one of my favorite figures from our past,

Journal

Radical History ReviewDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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