POSTCOLONIAL POLAND

POSTCOLONIAL POLAND Were it not for the language of the original text that I am quoting in English translation, this passage might be taken as from one of countless recent efforts to redress the strategic forgetfulness it laments by filling in gaps in the history of Western imperialism and by examining its divisive legacy in our current, postcolonial reality. The author, original language, and source of the passage call attention, though, to a kind of strategic forgetfulness that affects even theorists of postcolonialism as they struggle to rectify the cruelly biased, falsified, or 1. Czes´ Mi´ law losz, Zniewolony umysl (Paris: Instytut literacki, 1953; reprint, Krakow: Wydawnictwo literackie, 1999), 241– 42; Mi´ losz, The Captive Mind, trans. Jane Zielonko (New York: Vintage, 1981), 223. 10:1 Copyright 2004 by Duke University Press Jameson’s definition, and why does its absence feel so inconspicuous and selfevident? Surely the Russian empire and its twentieth-century descendant, the Soviet Union, would seem to merit a place in contemporary assessments of imperialism and its cultural consequences. Jameson’s elision, though, is unexceptional. Edward Said notes the “rather wide geographical and historical range” attempted in his own book Culture and Imperialism, and indeed his book spans two centuries of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Common Knowledge Duke University Press

POSTCOLONIAL POLAND

Common Knowledge, Volume 10 (1) – Jan 1, 2004

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0961-754X
eISSN
1538-4578
DOI
10.1215/0961754X-10-1-82
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Were it not for the language of the original text that I am quoting in English translation, this passage might be taken as from one of countless recent efforts to redress the strategic forgetfulness it laments by filling in gaps in the history of Western imperialism and by examining its divisive legacy in our current, postcolonial reality. The author, original language, and source of the passage call attention, though, to a kind of strategic forgetfulness that affects even theorists of postcolonialism as they struggle to rectify the cruelly biased, falsified, or 1. Czes´ Mi´ law losz, Zniewolony umysl (Paris: Instytut literacki, 1953; reprint, Krakow: Wydawnictwo literackie, 1999), 241– 42; Mi´ losz, The Captive Mind, trans. Jane Zielonko (New York: Vintage, 1981), 223. 10:1 Copyright 2004 by Duke University Press Jameson’s definition, and why does its absence feel so inconspicuous and selfevident? Surely the Russian empire and its twentieth-century descendant, the Soviet Union, would seem to merit a place in contemporary assessments of imperialism and its cultural consequences. Jameson’s elision, though, is unexceptional. Edward Said notes the “rather wide geographical and historical range” attempted in his own book Culture and Imperialism, and indeed his book spans two centuries of

Journal

Common KnowledgeDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2004

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