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Poetry: 1900 to the 1940s

Poetry: 1900 to the 1940s Perhaps the most exciting salient feature this year is the amount and quality of work on modern African American poets that appeared over the course of the year. The rich and varied literary productivity of Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Claude McKay, Sterling Brown, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Louise Bennett, and others continues to be relegated to short and often weak essays at the end of reference works, such as Sharon Lynette Jones’s “The Poetry of the Harlem Renaissance,” pp. 195–206 in Alex Davis and Lee M. Jenkins, eds., The Cambridge Companion to Modernist Poetry. Still, this poetry has generated a consistently interesting and sophisticated critical literature exemplified by a number of books and essays this year. While it lacks a strong argument and links the poets it treats with such unhelpful shifters as “also” and “another,” Jones’s survey rightly American Literary Scholarship (2007) doi 10.1215/00659142-2008-012 © 2009 by Duke University Press emphasizes the importance of the material infrastructure—the magazines like The Crisis and Opportunity, the organizations out of which they arose (the NAACP and National Urban League), and the anthologies (e.g., The New Negro, Caroling Dusk)—that enabled poets of the Harlem Renaissance to flourish. In Inventing Black Women Ajuan http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Literary Scholarship Duke University Press

Poetry: 1900 to the 1940s

American Literary Scholarship , Volume 2007 (1) – Jan 1, 2009

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2009 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0065-9142
eISSN
1527-2125
DOI
10.1215/00659142-2008-012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Perhaps the most exciting salient feature this year is the amount and quality of work on modern African American poets that appeared over the course of the year. The rich and varied literary productivity of Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Claude McKay, Sterling Brown, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Louise Bennett, and others continues to be relegated to short and often weak essays at the end of reference works, such as Sharon Lynette Jones’s “The Poetry of the Harlem Renaissance,” pp. 195–206 in Alex Davis and Lee M. Jenkins, eds., The Cambridge Companion to Modernist Poetry. Still, this poetry has generated a consistently interesting and sophisticated critical literature exemplified by a number of books and essays this year. While it lacks a strong argument and links the poets it treats with such unhelpful shifters as “also” and “another,” Jones’s survey rightly American Literary Scholarship (2007) doi 10.1215/00659142-2008-012 © 2009 by Duke University Press emphasizes the importance of the material infrastructure—the magazines like The Crisis and Opportunity, the organizations out of which they arose (the NAACP and National Urban League), and the anthologies (e.g., The New Negro, Caroling Dusk)—that enabled poets of the Harlem Renaissance to flourish. In Inventing Black Women Ajuan

Journal

American Literary ScholarshipDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2009

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