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"PITTSBURGHESE" ONLINE: VERNACULAR NORMING IN CONVERSATION

"PITTSBURGHESE" ONLINE: VERNACULAR NORMING IN CONVERSATION American Speech, Vol. 79, No. 2, Summer 2004 Copyright © 2004 by the American Dialect Society american speech 79.2 (2004) arguments about the dialect, its speakers, and the region. In some cases, these interactional demands lead to an activity we call “vernacular lexicography,” or explicit talk about what should be included in the dialect and why. To illustrate the role of ideology, we explore how the structure of the conversation as a whole, as well as the structure of particular contributions to it, draws on and reinforces widely shared ideas about how places, people, and dialects are “naturally” linked, and we show that arguments about what counts as local are supported with reference to local ideas about what constitutes local identity. We suggest that these ideas and the ways they are deployed in the discussion can result in some local features being more strongly identified with local speech than others. To illustrate the role of history, we show how geographic mobility caused by local economic changes has contributed to the heightened awareness of local identity that makes people engage in norm-forming discourse like this in the first place. Geographic mobility shapes the resulting norms both by privileging dialect http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic Usage Duke University Press

"PITTSBURGHESE" ONLINE: VERNACULAR NORMING IN CONVERSATION

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by American Dialect Society
ISSN
0003-1283
eISSN
1527-2133
DOI
10.1215/00031283-79-2-115
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

American Speech, Vol. 79, No. 2, Summer 2004 Copyright © 2004 by the American Dialect Society american speech 79.2 (2004) arguments about the dialect, its speakers, and the region. In some cases, these interactional demands lead to an activity we call “vernacular lexicography,” or explicit talk about what should be included in the dialect and why. To illustrate the role of ideology, we explore how the structure of the conversation as a whole, as well as the structure of particular contributions to it, draws on and reinforces widely shared ideas about how places, people, and dialects are “naturally” linked, and we show that arguments about what counts as local are supported with reference to local ideas about what constitutes local identity. We suggest that these ideas and the ways they are deployed in the discussion can result in some local features being more strongly identified with local speech than others. To illustrate the role of history, we show how geographic mobility caused by local economic changes has contributed to the heightened awareness of local identity that makes people engage in norm-forming discourse like this in the first place. Geographic mobility shapes the resulting norms both by privileging dialect

Journal

American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic UsageDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2004

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