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Physicians and Political Economy

Physicians and Political Economy Physicians and Political Economy. Edited by Peter Groenewegen. London: Routledge, 2001. 148 pp. €55.00. This slim volume contains studies of six doctor-economists. In order of appearance, they are Petty, Locke, Barbon, Mandeville, Quesnay, and Juglar. The authors largely rely on secondary sources for an account of the medical interests and activities of their subjects; William Coleman’s essay on Locke is particularly well served by the accounts written by Kenneth Dewhurst (1963) and Patrick Romanell (1984), while Tony Aspromourgos draws upon an Oxford D.Phil. of 1977. It is, however, strange that the work of Roy Porter is hardly referred to in the book, and then only tangentially. The basic approach of the book is historical, rather than analytical. The standard of scholarship is high, although such an approach tends to leave on one side issues that deserved to be probed—as in Marina Bianchi’s treatment of Barbon and the rate of interest. It may be the historical approach that leads to some other points at which a greater precision seems to be called for. Aspromourgos refers several times to Petty’s use of “algebra”—which is very puzzling indeed, in view of the content of Petty’s writings. Where Petty actually excelled was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Political Economy Duke University Press

Physicians and Political Economy

History of Political Economy , Volume 35 (3) – Sep 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2702
eISSN
1527-1919
DOI
10.1215/00182702-35-3-596
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Physicians and Political Economy. Edited by Peter Groenewegen. London: Routledge, 2001. 148 pp. €55.00. This slim volume contains studies of six doctor-economists. In order of appearance, they are Petty, Locke, Barbon, Mandeville, Quesnay, and Juglar. The authors largely rely on secondary sources for an account of the medical interests and activities of their subjects; William Coleman’s essay on Locke is particularly well served by the accounts written by Kenneth Dewhurst (1963) and Patrick Romanell (1984), while Tony Aspromourgos draws upon an Oxford D.Phil. of 1977. It is, however, strange that the work of Roy Porter is hardly referred to in the book, and then only tangentially. The basic approach of the book is historical, rather than analytical. The standard of scholarship is high, although such an approach tends to leave on one side issues that deserved to be probed—as in Marina Bianchi’s treatment of Barbon and the rate of interest. It may be the historical approach that leads to some other points at which a greater precision seems to be called for. Aspromourgos refers several times to Petty’s use of “algebra”—which is very puzzling indeed, in view of the content of Petty’s writings. Where Petty actually excelled was

Journal

History of Political EconomyDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2003

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