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People-of-Color-Blindness: Notes on the Afterlife of Slavery

People-of-Color-Blindness: Notes on the Afterlife of Slavery This article offers a critique of the concept of "people of color," highlighting a form of blindness to the singularity of racial slavery internal to its articulation. It pursues a theoretical itinerary that reads the radical black feminism of Saidiya Hartman and Hortense Spillers, the political ontology of Frank B. Wilderson, and the cinematic vision of Haile Gerima against certain signs of prevarication, even gainsaying, regarding the nature of slavery and its afterlife in prominent strains of critical (race) theory, here advanced by noted scholars like Giorgio Agamben and Achille Mbembe. The disseminated misrecognition of modern slavery is then traced in the discourse of post–civil rights racial politics, especially in the aftermath of September 11, 2001. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

People-of-Color-Blindness: Notes on the Afterlife of Slavery

Social Text , Volume 28 (2 103) – Jun 1, 2010

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-2009-066
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article offers a critique of the concept of "people of color," highlighting a form of blindness to the singularity of racial slavery internal to its articulation. It pursues a theoretical itinerary that reads the radical black feminism of Saidiya Hartman and Hortense Spillers, the political ontology of Frank B. Wilderson, and the cinematic vision of Haile Gerima against certain signs of prevarication, even gainsaying, regarding the nature of slavery and its afterlife in prominent strains of critical (race) theory, here advanced by noted scholars like Giorgio Agamben and Achille Mbembe. The disseminated misrecognition of modern slavery is then traced in the discourse of post–civil rights racial politics, especially in the aftermath of September 11, 2001.

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2010

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