Pathologies of Communication from Coleridge to Schreber

Pathologies of Communication from Coleridge to Schreber plagiarizing seminal texts of German philosophy that it is perhaps time to return the favor, and to contend that a book written some one hundred years after the second part of Christabel was composed—Daniel Paul Schreber’s Memoirs of My Nervous Illness—is merely an extended prose footnote to Coleridge’s poem.1 Or rather, I should say, it might be annexed to Christabel in fulfillment of Coleridge’s own intention to publish the poem ‘‘with two Essays annexed to it, on the Praeternatural—and on Metre.’’ 2 Think of those ‘‘preternatural’’ issues and themes that have drawn critical attention in commentary on The South Atlantic Quarterly :, Winter . Copyright ©  by Duke University Press. Celeste Langan Christabel—sounds and visions of dubious origin, spiritual possession, a family curse, and, of course, a scene of transgender or homosexual seduction—and we may find their equivalent in Schreber’s Memoirs.3 Schreber, a distinguished German judge whose descent into psychosis is first marked by a feeling—ambiguous product of a dream or waking thought—that ‘‘it really must be rather pleasant to be a woman succumbing to intercourse’’ (), develops the auditory and visual hallucinations of a paranoid schizophrenic. He conjectures that his ‘‘communication with supernatural powers,’’ which began http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png South Atlantic Quarterly Duke University Press

Pathologies of Communication from Coleridge to Schreber

South Atlantic Quarterly, Volume 102 (1) – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0038-2876
eISSN
1527-8026
DOI
10.1215/00382876-102-1-117
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

plagiarizing seminal texts of German philosophy that it is perhaps time to return the favor, and to contend that a book written some one hundred years after the second part of Christabel was composed—Daniel Paul Schreber’s Memoirs of My Nervous Illness—is merely an extended prose footnote to Coleridge’s poem.1 Or rather, I should say, it might be annexed to Christabel in fulfillment of Coleridge’s own intention to publish the poem ‘‘with two Essays annexed to it, on the Praeternatural—and on Metre.’’ 2 Think of those ‘‘preternatural’’ issues and themes that have drawn critical attention in commentary on The South Atlantic Quarterly :, Winter . Copyright ©  by Duke University Press. Celeste Langan Christabel—sounds and visions of dubious origin, spiritual possession, a family curse, and, of course, a scene of transgender or homosexual seduction—and we may find their equivalent in Schreber’s Memoirs.3 Schreber, a distinguished German judge whose descent into psychosis is first marked by a feeling—ambiguous product of a dream or waking thought—that ‘‘it really must be rather pleasant to be a woman succumbing to intercourse’’ (), develops the auditory and visual hallucinations of a paranoid schizophrenic. He conjectures that his ‘‘communication with supernatural powers,’’ which began

Journal

South Atlantic QuarterlyDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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