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"Our Master, the Novice": On the Catastrophic Births of Modern Turkish Poetry

"Our Master, the Novice": On the Catastrophic Births of Modern Turkish Poetry The South Atlantic Quarterly :/, Spring/Summer . Copyright ©  by Duke University Press. Orhan Koçak no Second New poet could bring himself to acknowledge, however, was also the movement’s supreme, perverse achievement: not only had they drawn many of the poets of the preceding generation into their own force field, but by their action, they had also compelled at least three of them to become more consummate poets than themselves. Cemal Süreya, a leading protagonist of the Second New, in an essay written just a year before his death in , would call attention to the group’s influence on its predecessors: There are two movements in the history of Turkish literature that have influenced earlier generations, or at least imbued them with fresh passions: The Servet-i Fünun [The Riches of Learning—a group of writers and poets that had been active at the end of the nineteenth century and were so labeled in reference to the journal that published their works] and the Second New. That a generation exerts some influence on the succeeding ones—this is only natural. But the reverse must be something rarely encountered. . . . There were as many poets who were influenced by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png South Atlantic Quarterly Duke University Press

"Our Master, the Novice": On the Catastrophic Births of Modern Turkish Poetry

South Atlantic Quarterly , Volume 102 (2-3) – Apr 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0038-2876
eISSN
1527-8026
DOI
10.1215/00382876-102-2-3-567
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The South Atlantic Quarterly :/, Spring/Summer . Copyright ©  by Duke University Press. Orhan Koçak no Second New poet could bring himself to acknowledge, however, was also the movement’s supreme, perverse achievement: not only had they drawn many of the poets of the preceding generation into their own force field, but by their action, they had also compelled at least three of them to become more consummate poets than themselves. Cemal Süreya, a leading protagonist of the Second New, in an essay written just a year before his death in , would call attention to the group’s influence on its predecessors: There are two movements in the history of Turkish literature that have influenced earlier generations, or at least imbued them with fresh passions: The Servet-i Fünun [The Riches of Learning—a group of writers and poets that had been active at the end of the nineteenth century and were so labeled in reference to the journal that published their works] and the Second New. That a generation exerts some influence on the succeeding ones—this is only natural. But the reverse must be something rarely encountered. . . . There were as many poets who were influenced by

Journal

South Atlantic QuarterlyDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2003

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