Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

On Mariama Bâ's Novels, Stereotypes, and Silence

On Mariama Bâ's Novels, Stereotypes, and Silence , ereotypes, and Silence m o ra pa ti v , d u ca ies an of d A u th M si a ri Af th e l Vo i do © 2 7, 2 No , 20 07 20 1xi ve - 01 6 ss 08 5 /1 D by e uk Un ty r si Pr e he title of this article is borrowed from Trudier Harris’s essay that analyzes the reception of Alice Walker’s The Color Purple.1 Harris argues that Walker had been chosen by the one-track-minded American media, which, “by its very raci nature, seems able to focus on only one black writer at a time.”2 The publicity had in turn crted “a cadre of spectator rders . . . who do not identify with the characters and who do not feel the intensity of their pain, [but] and back and view the events of the novel as a circus of black human interactions.”3 Harris sugges that the acclaim Walker’s novel received had discouraged critics from writing critical reviews, even though the characters appred implausible again the hiorical background and experience of black Americans. I raise similar concerns about the incrsing critical focus http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East Duke University Press

On Mariama Bâ's Novels, Stereotypes, and Silence

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/on-mariama-b-s-novels-stereotypes-and-silence-V4RQJE0o2x
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
© 2007 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1089-201X
eISSN
1089-201X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

, ereotypes, and Silence m o ra pa ti v , d u ca ies an of d A u th M si a ri Af th e l Vo i do © 2 7, 2 No , 20 07 20 1xi ve - 01 6 ss 08 5 /1 D by e uk Un ty r si Pr e he title of this article is borrowed from Trudier Harris’s essay that analyzes the reception of Alice Walker’s The Color Purple.1 Harris argues that Walker had been chosen by the one-track-minded American media, which, “by its very raci nature, seems able to focus on only one black writer at a time.”2 The publicity had in turn crted “a cadre of spectator rders . . . who do not identify with the characters and who do not feel the intensity of their pain, [but] and back and view the events of the novel as a circus of black human interactions.”3 Harris sugges that the acclaim Walker’s novel received had discouraged critics from writing critical reviews, even though the characters appred implausible again the hiorical background and experience of black Americans. I raise similar concerns about the incrsing critical focus

Journal

Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle EastDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2007

There are no references for this article.