No Mere Passing Interest

No Mere Passing Interest Page 539 Reviews Falling into Theory: Conflicting Views on Reading Literature. 2d ed. Ed. David H. Richter. New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2000. The Undergraduate Curriculum in Theory Suzy Anger Just how much theory literature students should get early in their undergraduate studies is a question that frequently surfaces in departmental discussions of curriculum. Should they become acquainted with literary texts and learn to read and write about them before they are introduced to the contemporary theoretical debates that absorb many of us in literature departments? Or is it more effective to introduce undergraduates to the critical controversies early so they can recognize the approaches they encounter in their classes and situate their own reading and writing in those debates? The latter view is the driving principle of David H. Richter’s anthology Falling into Theory. “Students,” Richter argues, “need as early as possible an exposure to the debates themselves to mark out their own positions” (ix). He regards his book as a “primer” that implements Gerald Graff’s belief that we should “teach the conflicts.” It aims to involve students in the issues of academic debate, to “get them engaged in our conversation” (ix). This anthology is valuable in many http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture Duke University Press

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1531-4200
eISSN
1533-6255
D.O.I.
10.1215/15314200-1-3-560
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Page 539 Reviews Falling into Theory: Conflicting Views on Reading Literature. 2d ed. Ed. David H. Richter. New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2000. The Undergraduate Curriculum in Theory Suzy Anger Just how much theory literature students should get early in their undergraduate studies is a question that frequently surfaces in departmental discussions of curriculum. Should they become acquainted with literary texts and learn to read and write about them before they are introduced to the contemporary theoretical debates that absorb many of us in literature departments? Or is it more effective to introduce undergraduates to the critical controversies early so they can recognize the approaches they encounter in their classes and situate their own reading and writing in those debates? The latter view is the driving principle of David H. Richter’s anthology Falling into Theory. “Students,” Richter argues, “need as early as possible an exposure to the debates themselves to mark out their own positions” (ix). He regards his book as a “primer” that implements Gerald Graff’s belief that we should “teach the conflicts.” It aims to involve students in the issues of academic debate, to “get them engaged in our conversation” (ix). This anthology is valuable in many

Journal

Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and CultureDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2001

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