Narratives of Discomfort and Ideology: Yang Kui's Short Fiction and Postcolonial Taiwan Orthodox Boundaries

Narratives of Discomfort and Ideology: Yang Kui's Short Fiction and Postcolonial Taiwan Orthodox... Narratives of Discomfort and Ideology: Yang Kui’s Short Fiction and Postcolonial Taiwan Orthodox Boundaries Bert Scruggs Colonial Taiwan and a Postcolonial Problem Taiwan and the Taiwanese became subjects of the colonial Japanese Empire in 1895 when the moribund Qing government ceded the islands to Meiji Japan under the Treaty of Shimonoseki (Shimonoseki Jyyaku, Maguan Tiaoyue). During the turnover period, the “option of nationality” (kokuseki sentaku, guoji xuanze) offered a chance for many to return to continental China.1 In fact, this opportunity led to an exodus of wealthy Qing loyalists and government officials. Following this massive brain drain, the remaining social elite, possibly at the suggestion of the Qing court, established the Republic of Taiwan. The new government sought help from the United States as well as European nations; however, because no other nations came to its aid, the new republic collapsed when the Japanese military landed. From the arrival of the Japanese forces until 1945, a colonial government positions 14:2 doi 10.1215/10679847-2006-008 Copyright 2006 by Duke University Press positions 14:2 Fall 2006 separate but subordinate to the Tokyo central government administered Taiwan.2 The fifty-year colonization of Taiwan, unlike the relatively brief occupations of Hong Kong, Shanghai, or other http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Narratives of Discomfort and Ideology: Yang Kui's Short Fiction and Postcolonial Taiwan Orthodox Boundaries

positions asia critique, Volume 14 (2) – Sep 1, 2006

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
© 2006 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1067-9847
DOI
10.1215/10679847-2006-008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Narratives of Discomfort and Ideology: Yang Kui’s Short Fiction and Postcolonial Taiwan Orthodox Boundaries Bert Scruggs Colonial Taiwan and a Postcolonial Problem Taiwan and the Taiwanese became subjects of the colonial Japanese Empire in 1895 when the moribund Qing government ceded the islands to Meiji Japan under the Treaty of Shimonoseki (Shimonoseki Jyyaku, Maguan Tiaoyue). During the turnover period, the “option of nationality” (kokuseki sentaku, guoji xuanze) offered a chance for many to return to continental China.1 In fact, this opportunity led to an exodus of wealthy Qing loyalists and government officials. Following this massive brain drain, the remaining social elite, possibly at the suggestion of the Qing court, established the Republic of Taiwan. The new government sought help from the United States as well as European nations; however, because no other nations came to its aid, the new republic collapsed when the Japanese military landed. From the arrival of the Japanese forces until 1945, a colonial government positions 14:2 doi 10.1215/10679847-2006-008 Copyright 2006 by Duke University Press positions 14:2 Fall 2006 separate but subordinate to the Tokyo central government administered Taiwan.2 The fifty-year colonization of Taiwan, unlike the relatively brief occupations of Hong Kong, Shanghai, or other

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positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2006

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