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Mourning, Sound, and Vision: Jean-Luc Godard's JLG/JLG

Mourning, Sound, and Vision: Jean-Luc Godard's JLG/JLG Copyright © 2000 by Camera Obscura Camera Obscura 44, Volume 15, Number 2 Published by Duke University Press 75 • Camera Obscura does not hierarchize the aural and the visual. On the contrary, it fuses the two together as a sound image or rebus, and it is in this way that the sequence makes sense. But my aim in singling out this part of the film is not to insist on its symptomatic layering. Instead I want to emphasize first the salience in both the audial and visual tracks of a pervasive funereal quality; second, the indexicality of a path that leads elsewhere and a sound that comes from somewhere else; and third, the manner in which this sequence epitomizes the overall project of JLG/JLG. I will not try to gloss these matters here; instead, I will move directly to the context of the film, and more specifically, its particular relationship to Godard’s overall body of work. Jean-Luc Godard has consistently been viewed as one of the main practitioners and theorists of an alternative or countertraditional narrative cinema. His experiments with representations of history, truth, and fiction, media such as video, television, and film, as well as techniques http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Camera Obscura Duke University Press

Mourning, Sound, and Vision: Jean-Luc Godard's JLG/JLG

Camera Obscura , Volume 15 (2 44) – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Camera Obscura
ISSN
1529-1510
eISSN
1529-1510
DOI
10.1215/02705346-15-2_44-75
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Copyright © 2000 by Camera Obscura Camera Obscura 44, Volume 15, Number 2 Published by Duke University Press 75 • Camera Obscura does not hierarchize the aural and the visual. On the contrary, it fuses the two together as a sound image or rebus, and it is in this way that the sequence makes sense. But my aim in singling out this part of the film is not to insist on its symptomatic layering. Instead I want to emphasize first the salience in both the audial and visual tracks of a pervasive funereal quality; second, the indexicality of a path that leads elsewhere and a sound that comes from somewhere else; and third, the manner in which this sequence epitomizes the overall project of JLG/JLG. I will not try to gloss these matters here; instead, I will move directly to the context of the film, and more specifically, its particular relationship to Godard’s overall body of work. Jean-Luc Godard has consistently been viewed as one of the main practitioners and theorists of an alternative or countertraditional narrative cinema. His experiments with representations of history, truth, and fiction, media such as video, television, and film, as well as techniques

Journal

Camera ObscuraDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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