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Monumental Histories: Manliness, the Military, and the War Memorial

Monumental Histories: Manliness, the Military, and the War Memorial ow does one commemorate a war that is technically not yet over? While the Korean War, at least for Americans, “ended” in 1953, the discourse of commemoration about the war has not been brought to closure in Korean society.1 How does one bring closure to a war for which the central narrative is one of division and dissent, a war whose history is still in the process of being made? In South Korea, the official commemoration of the Korean War has always had an anti–North Korean character. But this official view was questioned in the An earlier and much shorter version of this essay appeared in Museum Anthropology 21, no. 3 (1997): 33 – 39. Support for this work was provided by an American Council of Learned Societies/ Social Science Research Council postdoctoral fellowship and grants from the Korea Foundation, the Asia Research Fund, and the Daesan Foundation. For their assistance, I extend my sincere thanks to Chang Ch|ng-dok, Kim Y|ng-nam, Lee Sung-kwan and Choi Young-jeep. Many thanks to my husband, Jiyul Kim, as always, for his detailed readings, astute critique, and boundless support. Romanization of Korean has followed the McCune-Reishauer system but some of the proper names http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Public Culture Duke University Press

Monumental Histories: Manliness, the Military, and the War Memorial

Public Culture , Volume 14 (2) – Apr 1, 2002

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0899-2363
eISSN
1527-8018
DOI
10.1215/08992363-14-2-387
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ow does one commemorate a war that is technically not yet over? While the Korean War, at least for Americans, “ended” in 1953, the discourse of commemoration about the war has not been brought to closure in Korean society.1 How does one bring closure to a war for which the central narrative is one of division and dissent, a war whose history is still in the process of being made? In South Korea, the official commemoration of the Korean War has always had an anti–North Korean character. But this official view was questioned in the An earlier and much shorter version of this essay appeared in Museum Anthropology 21, no. 3 (1997): 33 – 39. Support for this work was provided by an American Council of Learned Societies/ Social Science Research Council postdoctoral fellowship and grants from the Korea Foundation, the Asia Research Fund, and the Daesan Foundation. For their assistance, I extend my sincere thanks to Chang Ch|ng-dok, Kim Y|ng-nam, Lee Sung-kwan and Choi Young-jeep. Many thanks to my husband, Jiyul Kim, as always, for his detailed readings, astute critique, and boundless support. Romanization of Korean has followed the McCune-Reishauer system but some of the proper names

Journal

Public CultureDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2002

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