Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Mei Lanfang and the Nationalization of Peking Opera, 1912-1930

Mei Lanfang and the Nationalization of Peking Opera, 1912-1930 p m o m 7 2 0 1999 by I h k e University Press positions 7:2 Fall 1999 3 78 Real peace cannot come from reliance on military force. . . . If we want to protect real world peace, humanity must mutually understand, mutually tolerate and sympathize, mutually assist and not battle. . . . To achieve this goal everyone must concretely study both art and science to understand each other’s problems. . . . T h e people of my country, in common with yours, desire peace among nations. . . . You condescend to view our imperfect portrayals of China’s ancient drama . . . and you have chosen me for this distinction [the bestowal of an honorary doctorate], which is intended as an expression of your friendship for my people.’ Attaching such earnest purpose to a Peking opera tour stamps it as a utopian mission, and, since Mei’s above graduation speech was extolled as “a model of public utterance” throughout the press, his listeners must have seen his point.2 China-U.S. relations at the time were far from harmonious. T h e predominant images of Chinese people in American newspapers were of starving, ignorant http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png positions asia critique Duke University Press

Mei Lanfang and the Nationalization of Peking Opera, 1912-1930

positions asia critique , Volume 7 (2) – Sep 1, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/mei-lanfang-and-the-nationalization-of-peking-opera-1912-1930-Or0e6AIxxf

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1067-9847
eISSN
1527-8271
DOI
10.1215/10679847-7-2-377
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

p m o m 7 2 0 1999 by I h k e University Press positions 7:2 Fall 1999 3 78 Real peace cannot come from reliance on military force. . . . If we want to protect real world peace, humanity must mutually understand, mutually tolerate and sympathize, mutually assist and not battle. . . . To achieve this goal everyone must concretely study both art and science to understand each other’s problems. . . . T h e people of my country, in common with yours, desire peace among nations. . . . You condescend to view our imperfect portrayals of China’s ancient drama . . . and you have chosen me for this distinction [the bestowal of an honorary doctorate], which is intended as an expression of your friendship for my people.’ Attaching such earnest purpose to a Peking opera tour stamps it as a utopian mission, and, since Mei’s above graduation speech was extolled as “a model of public utterance” throughout the press, his listeners must have seen his point.2 China-U.S. relations at the time were far from harmonious. T h e predominant images of Chinese people in American newspapers were of starving, ignorant

Journal

positions asia critiqueDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.