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Managing Inequality: Northern Racial Liberalism in Interwar Detroit by Karen Miller

Managing Inequality: Northern Racial Liberalism in Interwar Detroit by Karen Miller . 3    Managing Inequality: Northern Racial Liberalism in Interwar Detroit Karen Miller New York: New York University Press, 2015 xi + 352 pp., $55.00 (cloth); $28.00 (paper) In her captivating study of interwar Detroit, Karen Miller sets out to uncover the origins of color-blind racism. Color-blind racism, she argues, is key to understanding modern American politics but is itself not properly understood. In particular, its historical origins have often been misconstrued by historians of the postwar period. Rather than locate the point of origin in the post-1945 period, as she argues these historians have, Miller places it in the 1920s and 1930s. To convince scholars to shift their attention to the earlier era, Miller develops an analysis of what she contends was the prevailing racial ideology in Detroit between the wars, an ideology she terms “northern racial liberalism” (3). Northern racial liberals were whites who were concerned primarily not with fairness but with control: control of African Americans’ aspirations for racial equality and control of racist violence and the threat it posed to orderly metropolitan growth. And although over the 1920s and 1930s a growing number of northern racial liberals evinced a more sincere but still distinctly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas Duke University Press

Managing Inequality: Northern Racial Liberalism in Interwar Detroit by Karen Miller

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright � Duke Univ Press
ISSN
1547-6715
eISSN
1558-1454
DOI
10.1215/15476715-3921404
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

. 3    Managing Inequality: Northern Racial Liberalism in Interwar Detroit Karen Miller New York: New York University Press, 2015 xi + 352 pp., $55.00 (cloth); $28.00 (paper) In her captivating study of interwar Detroit, Karen Miller sets out to uncover the origins of color-blind racism. Color-blind racism, she argues, is key to understanding modern American politics but is itself not properly understood. In particular, its historical origins have often been misconstrued by historians of the postwar period. Rather than locate the point of origin in the post-1945 period, as she argues these historians have, Miller places it in the 1920s and 1930s. To convince scholars to shift their attention to the earlier era, Miller develops an analysis of what she contends was the prevailing racial ideology in Detroit between the wars, an ideology she terms “northern racial liberalism” (3). Northern racial liberals were whites who were concerned primarily not with fairness but with control: control of African Americans’ aspirations for racial equality and control of racist violence and the threat it posed to orderly metropolitan growth. And although over the 1920s and 1930s a growing number of northern racial liberals evinced a more sincere but still distinctly

Journal

Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the AmericasDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2017

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