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LAWCHA Approaches Its Twentieth Anniversary

LAWCHA Approaches Its Twentieth Anniversary James N. Gregory Twenty years ago, LAWCHA started to come together. The field of labor history had been operating for decades without a professional organization in part because of the many state and regional labor history associations already active. But the times demanded something more. The AFL-CIO had made a left turn, and many schol- ars were looking for ways to bring activism and labor history together. A meeting was called for the October 1998 North American Labor History Conference in Detroit, which approved a constitution and bylaws that had been drafted by Roger Horowitz and Cecilia Bucki. An organizing committee set to work, and a year later LAWCHA held its first ofc fi ial conference and elected ofc fi ers led by President Jacquelyn Hall and Vice President Joe Trotter. I have a couple of reasons for flagging this approaching anniversary. First, LAWCHA now has an ofc fi ial archive. The Reuther Library in Detroit is processing the first donation of records, covering our early years. I hope those who have saved correspondence and other relevant materials will contact Tom Klug about adding to the collection. Second, the twentieth anniversary is a good time to take stock and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Labor Duke University Press

LAWCHA Approaches Its Twentieth Anniversary

Labor , Volume 15 (1) – Mar 1, 2018

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Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Labor and Working-Class History Association
ISSN
1547-6715
eISSN
1558-1454
DOI
10.1215/15476715-4288629
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

James N. Gregory Twenty years ago, LAWCHA started to come together. The field of labor history had been operating for decades without a professional organization in part because of the many state and regional labor history associations already active. But the times demanded something more. The AFL-CIO had made a left turn, and many schol- ars were looking for ways to bring activism and labor history together. A meeting was called for the October 1998 North American Labor History Conference in Detroit, which approved a constitution and bylaws that had been drafted by Roger Horowitz and Cecilia Bucki. An organizing committee set to work, and a year later LAWCHA held its first ofc fi ial conference and elected ofc fi ers led by President Jacquelyn Hall and Vice President Joe Trotter. I have a couple of reasons for flagging this approaching anniversary. First, LAWCHA now has an ofc fi ial archive. The Reuther Library in Detroit is processing the first donation of records, covering our early years. I hope those who have saved correspondence and other relevant materials will contact Tom Klug about adding to the collection. Second, the twentieth anniversary is a good time to take stock and

Journal

LaborDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2018

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