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Labor under Fire: A History of the AFL-CIO since 1979 by Timothy Minchin

Labor under Fire: A History of the AFL-CIO since 1979 by Timothy Minchin B o o k R e v i e w s        135 Labor under Fire: A History of the AFL- CIO since 1979 Timothy Minchin Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2017 xiii + 432 pp., $39.95 (cloth); $29.95 (e- book) With around 12.5 million members in more than fifty affiliate unions, the AFL- CIO remains a standard- bearer for the struggles of the American labor movement over the last several decades. The Federation has been subjected to much critical analysis, but we have not had a detailed internal history of the organization, especially since the rise of global neoliberalism from around 1980. Timothy Minchin’s meticulously researched and clearly written book provides a valuable resource to fill that gap. The author provides a wealth of information from insider participants in major events, and while the story Minchin tells raises more questions than it answers, it reminds us of critical coni fl cts that are still with us today. Minchin acknowledges the limits of the AFL- CIO’s “golden era” under founding president George Meany, including the dominance of more conservative AFL unions, the lack of racial and gender representation, resistance to new organizing, and Cold War ide- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Labor Duke University Press

Labor under Fire: A History of the AFL-CIO since 1979 by Timothy Minchin

Labor , Volume 15 (3) – Sep 1, 2018

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Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Labor and Working-Class History Association
ISSN
1547-6715
eISSN
1558-1454
DOI
10.1215/15476715-6910477
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

B o o k R e v i e w s        135 Labor under Fire: A History of the AFL- CIO since 1979 Timothy Minchin Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2017 xiii + 432 pp., $39.95 (cloth); $29.95 (e- book) With around 12.5 million members in more than fifty affiliate unions, the AFL- CIO remains a standard- bearer for the struggles of the American labor movement over the last several decades. The Federation has been subjected to much critical analysis, but we have not had a detailed internal history of the organization, especially since the rise of global neoliberalism from around 1980. Timothy Minchin’s meticulously researched and clearly written book provides a valuable resource to fill that gap. The author provides a wealth of information from insider participants in major events, and while the story Minchin tells raises more questions than it answers, it reminds us of critical coni fl cts that are still with us today. Minchin acknowledges the limits of the AFL- CIO’s “golden era” under founding president George Meany, including the dominance of more conservative AFL unions, the lack of racial and gender representation, resistance to new organizing, and Cold War ide-

Journal

LaborDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2018

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