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Kondratiev and the Dynamics of Economic Development: Long Cycles and Industrial Growth in Historical Context

Kondratiev and the Dynamics of Economic Development: Long Cycles and Industrial Growth in... Book Reviews mist known to the many share tipsters, investment consultants, and other snake-oil merchants who profit from retailing what they understand of his ideas on “long cycles” of capitalist development. However, as Vincent Barnett explains in this scholarly and engaging book, there was much more to Kondratiev than this. Born into a peasant family near Vichuga, northeast of Moscow, Kondratiev studied under another eminent Russian (Ukrainian) economist, M. I. Tugan-Baranovskii, and displayed an early interest in the economic problems of Russian agriculture. Having joined the Social Revolutionary Party as a young man, in October 1917 Kondratiev served as minister of food supply in the last three weeks of the Kerensky government. He became a severe critic of the Bolshevik revolution and especially of the new regime’s agrarian policy. In the early years of the Soviet Union there was sufficient tolerance of dissenters for Kondratiev’s career not to be damaged by this. From 1920 to 1928 he was director of the Conjuncture Institute (an important center for the study of business cycles and economic forecasting techniques) in Moscow. Here he led an impressive team of researchers that included E. E. Slutsky of the eponymous equation, and appeared to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Political Economy Duke University Press

Kondratiev and the Dynamics of Economic Development: Long Cycles and Industrial Growth in Historical Context

History of Political Economy , Volume 32 (2) – Jun 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2702
eISSN
1527-1919
DOI
10.1215/00182702-32-2-406
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews mist known to the many share tipsters, investment consultants, and other snake-oil merchants who profit from retailing what they understand of his ideas on “long cycles” of capitalist development. However, as Vincent Barnett explains in this scholarly and engaging book, there was much more to Kondratiev than this. Born into a peasant family near Vichuga, northeast of Moscow, Kondratiev studied under another eminent Russian (Ukrainian) economist, M. I. Tugan-Baranovskii, and displayed an early interest in the economic problems of Russian agriculture. Having joined the Social Revolutionary Party as a young man, in October 1917 Kondratiev served as minister of food supply in the last three weeks of the Kerensky government. He became a severe critic of the Bolshevik revolution and especially of the new regime’s agrarian policy. In the early years of the Soviet Union there was sufficient tolerance of dissenters for Kondratiev’s career not to be damaged by this. From 1920 to 1928 he was director of the Conjuncture Institute (an important center for the study of business cycles and economic forecasting techniques) in Moscow. Here he led an impressive team of researchers that included E. E. Slutsky of the eponymous equation, and appeared to

Journal

History of Political EconomyDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2000

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