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KISS-TEETH

KISS-TEETH 1. kiss-teeth, suck-teeth, chups, cho!, and kst! We describe each of these individually, but our working hypothesis is that in performance they construct meaning in broadly similar ways. The core gesture is a conventionalized set of sounds which vary considerably in form, but all involve a velaric ingressive airstream modulated by a dual closure: one velar, one further forward. Parameters include point and type of articulation, duration and punctuality, tongue position, pitch, intensity, lip American Speech, Vol. 77, No. 4, Winter 2002 Copyright © 2002 by the American Dialect Society tension, and so forth (for details, see Rickford and Rickford 1976; Figueroa and Patrick 2001). All the terms in (1) refer to or re-create this complex of sounds; despite wide phonetic variation (individual, community, and regional), at one level all realizations may be labeled and interpreted as the same conventionalized, paralinguistic sign. Labeling is itself complex, however. Kiss-teeth and suck-teeth are metalinguistic terms which name the gesture; chups is both label and ideophone2—and all three can be used as both noun and verb (or verb phrase). Cho! and kst! are pure interjections with no naming properties, though cho! has enough lexical content to appear invariably in print, unlike http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic Usage Duke University Press

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by American Dialect Society
ISSN
0003-1283
eISSN
1527-2133
DOI
10.1215/00031283-77-4-383
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1. kiss-teeth, suck-teeth, chups, cho!, and kst! We describe each of these individually, but our working hypothesis is that in performance they construct meaning in broadly similar ways. The core gesture is a conventionalized set of sounds which vary considerably in form, but all involve a velaric ingressive airstream modulated by a dual closure: one velar, one further forward. Parameters include point and type of articulation, duration and punctuality, tongue position, pitch, intensity, lip American Speech, Vol. 77, No. 4, Winter 2002 Copyright © 2002 by the American Dialect Society tension, and so forth (for details, see Rickford and Rickford 1976; Figueroa and Patrick 2001). All the terms in (1) refer to or re-create this complex of sounds; despite wide phonetic variation (individual, community, and regional), at one level all realizations may be labeled and interpreted as the same conventionalized, paralinguistic sign. Labeling is itself complex, however. Kiss-teeth and suck-teeth are metalinguistic terms which name the gesture; chups is both label and ideophone2—and all three can be used as both noun and verb (or verb phrase). Cho! and kst! are pure interjections with no naming properties, though cho! has enough lexical content to appear invariably in print, unlike

Journal

American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic UsageDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2002

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