Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

JOE HILL'S PIE IN THE SKY AND SWEDISH REFLEXES OF THE LAND OF COCKAIGNE

JOE HILL'S PIE IN THE SKY AND SWEDISH REFLEXES OF THE LAND OF COCKAIGNE Long-haired preachers come out every night, Try to tell you what’s wrong and what’s right; But when asked how ’bout something to eat They answer with voices so sweet. Chorus: You will eat, bye and bye, In that glorious land above the sky; Work and pray, live on hay, You’ll get pie in the sky when you die.2 Quinion concludes: By 1911, other expressions using pie had already been around for some time, such as nice as pie and easy as pie and it had begun to be used for a bribe or political patronage (of rewards being distributed like slices of pie) so pie was already in the air, so to speak. American Speech, Vol. 77, No. 3, Fall 2002 Copyright © 2002 by the American Dialect Society Without refuting Quinion’s observation and neat kicker,3 this note seeks to push the origin of the phrase to a time and place beyond earlytwentieth-century America. Hill was born in Gävle, Sweden, in 1879 as Joel Häggland, although he later traveled in the United States under the names Joseph Hillström and Joe Hill. Hill received some musical training in the family home; then in 1902, like so many other Swedes http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic Usage Duke University Press

JOE HILL'S PIE IN THE SKY AND SWEDISH REFLEXES OF THE LAND OF COCKAIGNE

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/joe-hill-s-pie-in-the-sky-and-swedish-reflexes-of-the-land-of-rNjBrSPEp0
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by American Dialect Society
ISSN
0003-1283
eISSN
1527-2133
DOI
10.1215/00031283-77-3-331
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Long-haired preachers come out every night, Try to tell you what’s wrong and what’s right; But when asked how ’bout something to eat They answer with voices so sweet. Chorus: You will eat, bye and bye, In that glorious land above the sky; Work and pray, live on hay, You’ll get pie in the sky when you die.2 Quinion concludes: By 1911, other expressions using pie had already been around for some time, such as nice as pie and easy as pie and it had begun to be used for a bribe or political patronage (of rewards being distributed like slices of pie) so pie was already in the air, so to speak. American Speech, Vol. 77, No. 3, Fall 2002 Copyright © 2002 by the American Dialect Society Without refuting Quinion’s observation and neat kicker,3 this note seeks to push the origin of the phrase to a time and place beyond earlytwentieth-century America. Hill was born in Gävle, Sweden, in 1879 as Joel Häggland, although he later traveled in the United States under the names Joseph Hillström and Joe Hill. Hill received some musical training in the family home; then in 1902, like so many other Swedes

Journal

American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic UsageDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.