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Jean Toomer's Cane: Self as Montage and the Drive toward Integration

Jean Toomer's Cane: Self as Montage and the Drive toward Integration American Literature, Volume 72, Number 2, June 2000. Copyright © 2000 by Duke University Press. Tseng 2000.5.26 10:49 OCV:4 6059 American Literature 72:2 / sheet 38 of 223 276 American Literature The Self as Montage and the Multiple Narrator Tseng 2000.5.26 10:49 OCV:4 In Theory of the Avant-Garde Bürger argues that the autonomy achieved by the increasingly socially isolated aesthetic movement of the late nineteenth century made the formal experiments of the modernist period possible. The avant-garde artists, however, were critical of this dissociation and strove to reintegrate their new worldviews with society at large.1 The idea was to disrupt bourgeois conceptions of both art and reality by challenging not only conventional, institutional ideas of what art was but also ideas about how it was produced. Bürger argues that the montage, because of its ability to combine the real and the artificial, the object itself and the object represented, was the most powerful formal innovation of early-twentieth-century avantgardism.2 Although Toomer was not a member of the European avant-gardist circle, several personal, historical, and political factors made him susceptible to the influence of a movement and a form that stressed fragmentation and reintegration while using the freedom of autonomy http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Literature Duke University Press

Jean Toomer's Cane: Self as Montage and the Drive toward Integration

American Literature , Volume 72 (2) – Jun 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0002-9831
eISSN
1527-2117
DOI
10.1215/00029831-72-2-275
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

American Literature, Volume 72, Number 2, June 2000. Copyright © 2000 by Duke University Press. Tseng 2000.5.26 10:49 OCV:4 6059 American Literature 72:2 / sheet 38 of 223 276 American Literature The Self as Montage and the Multiple Narrator Tseng 2000.5.26 10:49 OCV:4 In Theory of the Avant-Garde Bürger argues that the autonomy achieved by the increasingly socially isolated aesthetic movement of the late nineteenth century made the formal experiments of the modernist period possible. The avant-garde artists, however, were critical of this dissociation and strove to reintegrate their new worldviews with society at large.1 The idea was to disrupt bourgeois conceptions of both art and reality by challenging not only conventional, institutional ideas of what art was but also ideas about how it was produced. Bürger argues that the montage, because of its ability to combine the real and the artificial, the object itself and the object represented, was the most powerful formal innovation of early-twentieth-century avantgardism.2 Although Toomer was not a member of the European avant-gardist circle, several personal, historical, and political factors made him susceptible to the influence of a movement and a form that stressed fragmentation and reintegration while using the freedom of autonomy

Journal

American LiteratureDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2000

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