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Islam and Stereotypical Discourse in Medieval Castile and Leon

Islam and Stereotypical Discourse in Medieval Castile and Leon Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 30:3, Fall 2000. Copyright © by Duke University Press / 2000 / $2.00. problem to be resolved in order to conclude that such representations are fundamentally either positive or negative. Rather, these stereotypes are necessarily ambivalent forms of knowledge that justify a social hierarchy maintaining Mudejar subjects in positions of subordination. In making this argument, I draw on Homi Bhabha’s theory of the colonial stereotype, a theory based on the Freudian notion of the fetish in order to show that colonial power entails a strategic need to maintain contradictory beliefs about colonized subjects: a belief that they are “other” so as to justify conquest and administration on the basis of racial difference; and a simultaneous belief that the colonized are “same” so as to make possible the surveillance of colonial power by rendering its subjects visible and knowable. In taking this approach, I set myself the prior task of demonstrating that the contexts of modern colonialism and Castilo-Leonese conquest of parts of Almohad Iberia are not only comparable, but comparable to a degree that colonial discourse analysis may be employed to arrive at genuinely meaningful generalizations about medieval Castilo-Leonese culture. Important http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies Duke University Press

Islam and Stereotypical Discourse in Medieval Castile and Leon

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1082-9636
eISSN
1527-8263
DOI
10.1215/10829636-30-3-479
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 30:3, Fall 2000. Copyright © by Duke University Press / 2000 / $2.00. problem to be resolved in order to conclude that such representations are fundamentally either positive or negative. Rather, these stereotypes are necessarily ambivalent forms of knowledge that justify a social hierarchy maintaining Mudejar subjects in positions of subordination. In making this argument, I draw on Homi Bhabha’s theory of the colonial stereotype, a theory based on the Freudian notion of the fetish in order to show that colonial power entails a strategic need to maintain contradictory beliefs about colonized subjects: a belief that they are “other” so as to justify conquest and administration on the basis of racial difference; and a simultaneous belief that the colonized are “same” so as to make possible the surveillance of colonial power by rendering its subjects visible and knowable. In taking this approach, I set myself the prior task of demonstrating that the contexts of modern colonialism and Castilo-Leonese conquest of parts of Almohad Iberia are not only comparable, but comparable to a degree that colonial discourse analysis may be employed to arrive at genuinely meaningful generalizations about medieval Castilo-Leonese culture. Important

Journal

Journal of Medieval and Early Modern StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2000

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