Is Not Everything Good to Eat, Good to Talk: Sexual Economy and Dancehall Music in the Global Marketplace

Is Not Everything Good to Eat, Good to Talk: Sexual Economy and Dancehall Music in the Global... uju Banton’s artistic and spiritual journey, from a “slackness” DJ to “roots and culture,” chronicles several of the complex negotiations taking place between musical artists and the global record industry. Known as a “conscious vibes” artist, Buju Banton’s ascendancy to the top of Jamaican popular music is one of Jamaica’s untold stories, a story that chronicles the struggle to survive in the marketplace. His is not simply a tale of individual sacrifice but an instance of how artists attempt to use cultural Small Axe 13, March 2003: pp. 95–115 ISSN 0799-0537 value as a means of mediating the hegemonic force of market values in the age of global capitalism. Buju Banton is one of the more successful dancehall-DJs-turned-consciousvibes artists. Banton’s song “Boom Bye-Bye” serves as an occasion to explore how market small values influence the cultural values expressed in Jamaican cultural commodities proaxe duced for “glocal” consumption.¹ e increasing desire for cultural commodities, particularly “diverse” or “exotic” music, clothes, and foods, were part of the market appeal of Jamaican dancehall music for Americans. e song received substantial airplay on the radio and in dance clubs, but when news of its (translated) content hit the airwaves, the song was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism Duke University Press

Is Not Everything Good to Eat, Good to Talk: Sexual Economy and Dancehall Music in the Global Marketplace

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Small Axe, Inc.
ISSN
0799-0537
eISSN
1534-6714
DOI
10.1215/-7-1-95
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

uju Banton’s artistic and spiritual journey, from a “slackness” DJ to “roots and culture,” chronicles several of the complex negotiations taking place between musical artists and the global record industry. Known as a “conscious vibes” artist, Buju Banton’s ascendancy to the top of Jamaican popular music is one of Jamaica’s untold stories, a story that chronicles the struggle to survive in the marketplace. His is not simply a tale of individual sacrifice but an instance of how artists attempt to use cultural Small Axe 13, March 2003: pp. 95–115 ISSN 0799-0537 value as a means of mediating the hegemonic force of market values in the age of global capitalism. Buju Banton is one of the more successful dancehall-DJs-turned-consciousvibes artists. Banton’s song “Boom Bye-Bye” serves as an occasion to explore how market small values influence the cultural values expressed in Jamaican cultural commodities proaxe duced for “glocal” consumption.¹ e increasing desire for cultural commodities, particularly “diverse” or “exotic” music, clothes, and foods, were part of the market appeal of Jamaican dancehall music for Americans. e song received substantial airplay on the radio and in dance clubs, but when news of its (translated) content hit the airwaves, the song was

Journal

Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of CriticismDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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