Introduction: Violence, Redemption, and the Liberal Imagination

Introduction: Violence, Redemption, and the Liberal Imagination We thank all of our colleagues in the Late Liberalism Project — Lauren Berlant, Elaine Hadley, Charles Hirschkind, Saba Mahmood, Beth Povinelli, Rolph Trouillot, and Michael Warner—and we especially thank Elaine Hadley and Beth Povinelli, as well as Kaylin Goldstein and Jessen Kelly at , for comments on earlier versions. 1. Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan, ed. Richard Tuck (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996), chaps. 13 – 18; John Locke, Two Treatises of Government, ed. Peter Laslett (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988), pt. 2, secs. 4–21, 77–131. For an exemplary trace of this story in contemporary contractarianism, see John Rawls’s account of the “circumstances of justice,” which include scarcity, conflicts of interest, and vulnerability to attack. For Rawls, the circumstances of justice help guide deliberation in his hypothetical “original position”—that is, the position from which the social contract is negotiated, in which citizens are supposed to be deprived of any knowledge of their concrete socioeconomic circumstances; see Rawls, A Theory of Justice (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1971), sec. 22. For a neo-Hobbist account that makes the Hobbist state of nature central to a 15(1): 1–10 Copyright © 2003 by Duke University Press This is an image of redemption from violence. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Public Culture Duke University Press

Introduction: Violence, Redemption, and the Liberal Imagination

Public Culture, Volume 15 (1) – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0899-2363
eISSN
1527-8018
DOI
10.1215/08992363-15-1-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We thank all of our colleagues in the Late Liberalism Project — Lauren Berlant, Elaine Hadley, Charles Hirschkind, Saba Mahmood, Beth Povinelli, Rolph Trouillot, and Michael Warner—and we especially thank Elaine Hadley and Beth Povinelli, as well as Kaylin Goldstein and Jessen Kelly at , for comments on earlier versions. 1. Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan, ed. Richard Tuck (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996), chaps. 13 – 18; John Locke, Two Treatises of Government, ed. Peter Laslett (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988), pt. 2, secs. 4–21, 77–131. For an exemplary trace of this story in contemporary contractarianism, see John Rawls’s account of the “circumstances of justice,” which include scarcity, conflicts of interest, and vulnerability to attack. For Rawls, the circumstances of justice help guide deliberation in his hypothetical “original position”—that is, the position from which the social contract is negotiated, in which citizens are supposed to be deprived of any knowledge of their concrete socioeconomic circumstances; see Rawls, A Theory of Justice (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1971), sec. 22. For a neo-Hobbist account that makes the Hobbist state of nature central to a 15(1): 1–10 Copyright © 2003 by Duke University Press This is an image of redemption from violence.

Journal

Public CultureDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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