Introduction to "A Correspondence on Provincializing Europe"

Introduction to "A Correspondence on Provincializing Europe" Page 143 REFLECTIONS Duane Corpis For many of us, e-mail generally has the feel of a tidal wave — too many messages flood our electronic mailboxes and leave us feeling as if we are drowning in the very technological medium that originally promised to make life easier, more efficient, and instantaneous. The nature of e-mail efficiency has transformed the practice of letter writing. Too often we substitute the short, spontaneous, stripped-down electronic message for more deliberate, thoughtful, and (ultimately) expressive forms of interpersonal written communications. But despite the feeling of drowning in e-mails, few of us working in the academy today could accomplish our tasks without electronic communication. This dependence on cybertechnology unveils yet one more way in which institutions that at first seem shielded from capitalism and the market, including the university, actually participate in a corporatized framework that informs the everyday practices of all those who work within those institutions. We have in part integrated e-mail into our lives because it promises us greater workplace productivity, even if the constant deluge of messages that we receive on a daily basis frequently erodes that productivity. How refreshing it was for me, then, to read the e-mail correspondence http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Radical History Review Duke University Press

Introduction to "A Correspondence on Provincializing Europe"

Radical History Review, Volume 2002 (83) – Apr 1, 2002

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by MARHO: The Radical Historians' Organization, Inc.
ISSN
0163-6545
eISSN
1534-1453
DOI
10.1215/01636545-2002-83-143
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Page 143 REFLECTIONS Duane Corpis For many of us, e-mail generally has the feel of a tidal wave — too many messages flood our electronic mailboxes and leave us feeling as if we are drowning in the very technological medium that originally promised to make life easier, more efficient, and instantaneous. The nature of e-mail efficiency has transformed the practice of letter writing. Too often we substitute the short, spontaneous, stripped-down electronic message for more deliberate, thoughtful, and (ultimately) expressive forms of interpersonal written communications. But despite the feeling of drowning in e-mails, few of us working in the academy today could accomplish our tasks without electronic communication. This dependence on cybertechnology unveils yet one more way in which institutions that at first seem shielded from capitalism and the market, including the university, actually participate in a corporatized framework that informs the everyday practices of all those who work within those institutions. We have in part integrated e-mail into our lives because it promises us greater workplace productivity, even if the constant deluge of messages that we receive on a daily basis frequently erodes that productivity. How refreshing it was for me, then, to read the e-mail correspondence

Journal

Radical History ReviewDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2002

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