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Introduction: PALESTINE IN A TRANSNATIONAL CONTEXT

Introduction: PALESTINE IN A TRANSNATIONAL CONTEXT Social Text 75, Vol. 21, No. 2, Summer 2003. Copyright © 2003 by Duke University Press. Timothy Mitchell, Gyan Prakash, and Ella Shohat Africa, but rather to place the Palestine question in a transnational and comparative frame, and to try to understand it in its historical complexity. In the aftermath of World War II, the hegemonic powers attempted to resolve the question of Palestine through a plan of partition. Postwar Europe sought to compensate for its deplorable record of genocidal practices toward Jewish communities of Europe by adopting a characteristically colonial solution — the partition of Palestine, and the displacement of its people from their lands to provide a state for European Jews. From the very beginning, therefore, the problem has been transnational, involving diverse populations, nation-states, and imperial powers, especially since the principle of the separation of Arabs and Jews had the concomitant effect of displacing Arab Jews from Arab countries (see the essay here by Ella Shohat). Furthermore, partition involved new articulations of nation and community, redefining the relationship between national identity and the nation-state. If the state was to be a nation-state, claiming to represent a singular national identity, then what was to be the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

Introduction: PALESTINE IN A TRANSNATIONAL CONTEXT

Social Text , Volume 21 (2 75) – Jun 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-21-2_75-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Social Text 75, Vol. 21, No. 2, Summer 2003. Copyright © 2003 by Duke University Press. Timothy Mitchell, Gyan Prakash, and Ella Shohat Africa, but rather to place the Palestine question in a transnational and comparative frame, and to try to understand it in its historical complexity. In the aftermath of World War II, the hegemonic powers attempted to resolve the question of Palestine through a plan of partition. Postwar Europe sought to compensate for its deplorable record of genocidal practices toward Jewish communities of Europe by adopting a characteristically colonial solution — the partition of Palestine, and the displacement of its people from their lands to provide a state for European Jews. From the very beginning, therefore, the problem has been transnational, involving diverse populations, nation-states, and imperial powers, especially since the principle of the separation of Arabs and Jews had the concomitant effect of displacing Arab Jews from Arab countries (see the essay here by Ella Shohat). Furthermore, partition involved new articulations of nation and community, redefining the relationship between national identity and the nation-state. If the state was to be a nation-state, claiming to represent a singular national identity, then what was to be the

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2003

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