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Introduction: Getting Back the Land

Introduction: Getting Back the Land Shiri Pasternak and Dayna Nadine Scott Who brought law to a new land already dense with legal orders and declared theirs universal? Who claims absolute authority to determine land access and use based on these laws? Whose laws should govern the resource economy? In Canada, these questions are essential for understanding why dispossession is ongoing and how it can be reversed. Canada’s claim to exclusive territorial author- ity across all the lands and waters is a failed project. But that fact has only succeeded in more complex legal and political subterfuge as Canada has sought to mitigate this uncertainty with grander perfor- mances of recognition. The essays in this issue offer diagnosis, critique, and radical visions for the future from some of the leading thinkers and experts on the tactics of the settler capitalist state, and on the exercises of Indigenous jurisdiction that counter them. It provides readers with the develop- ments on the ground that are continually moving the gauge towards Indigenous self-determination even in the face of ramped up nationalist rhetoric fueled by a divisive politics of extraction. Canada has always been treated, internation- ally, as a repository of resources for other nations. Rupert’s Land—a massive region http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png South Atlantic Quarterly Duke University Press

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Copyright
© 2020 Duke University Press
ISSN
0038-2876
eISSN
1527-8026
DOI
10.1215/00382876-8177723
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Shiri Pasternak and Dayna Nadine Scott Who brought law to a new land already dense with legal orders and declared theirs universal? Who claims absolute authority to determine land access and use based on these laws? Whose laws should govern the resource economy? In Canada, these questions are essential for understanding why dispossession is ongoing and how it can be reversed. Canada’s claim to exclusive territorial author- ity across all the lands and waters is a failed project. But that fact has only succeeded in more complex legal and political subterfuge as Canada has sought to mitigate this uncertainty with grander perfor- mances of recognition. The essays in this issue offer diagnosis, critique, and radical visions for the future from some of the leading thinkers and experts on the tactics of the settler capitalist state, and on the exercises of Indigenous jurisdiction that counter them. It provides readers with the develop- ments on the ground that are continually moving the gauge towards Indigenous self-determination even in the face of ramped up nationalist rhetoric fueled by a divisive politics of extraction. Canada has always been treated, internation- ally, as a repository of resources for other nations. Rupert’s Land—a massive region

Journal

South Atlantic QuarterlyDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2020

References