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Introduction: 911--A PUBLIC EMERGENCY?

Introduction: 911--A PUBLIC EMERGENCY? Social Text 72, Vol. 20, No. 3, Fall 2002. Copyright © 2002 by Duke University Press. Randy Martin and Ella Shohat Social Text is devoted to opening up both the analysis and the interventions, to complicate the terms of good and evil, under the shadow of which we are supposed to think our world and operate within it. Our contribution comes amid many journals of leftist tendency that have had to grapple with the problem of publishing after the fact under the presumption of continued urgency to complicate reductive terms of public reception. Manichean narratives are always tempting because they give us a false sense of moral security, wrapping us in a narcissistic cocoon, allowing us to digest the indigestible, to assimilate the unacceptable. Within this discourse, an orderly and peaceful world has been subjected to arbitrary and irrational attack, and our own regenerative violence will restore the everyday order of the world “before the fall,” a prelapsarian order for which the “American Nation” is already nostalgic. The desire to narrate events in this manner is an understandable response in the wake of a traumatic crisis, but it is also our civic responsibility to be skeptical about such http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

Introduction: 911--A PUBLIC EMERGENCY?

Social Text , Volume 20 (3 72) – Sep 1, 2002

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-20-3_72-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Social Text 72, Vol. 20, No. 3, Fall 2002. Copyright © 2002 by Duke University Press. Randy Martin and Ella Shohat Social Text is devoted to opening up both the analysis and the interventions, to complicate the terms of good and evil, under the shadow of which we are supposed to think our world and operate within it. Our contribution comes amid many journals of leftist tendency that have had to grapple with the problem of publishing after the fact under the presumption of continued urgency to complicate reductive terms of public reception. Manichean narratives are always tempting because they give us a false sense of moral security, wrapping us in a narcissistic cocoon, allowing us to digest the indigestible, to assimilate the unacceptable. Within this discourse, an orderly and peaceful world has been subjected to arbitrary and irrational attack, and our own regenerative violence will restore the everyday order of the world “before the fall,” a prelapsarian order for which the “American Nation” is already nostalgic. The desire to narrate events in this manner is an understandable response in the wake of a traumatic crisis, but it is also our civic responsibility to be skeptical about such

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2002

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