Introducing... Cultural Citizenship

Introducing... Cultural Citizenship the eighteenth century, though it remains unevenly spread across the globe. Economic citizenship covers employment, health, and retirement security through the redistribution of capitalist gains and the use of the state as an agent of investment. In the words of Australia’s prime minister during World War II, John Curtin, “government should be the agency whereby the masses should be lifted up” (quoted in Van Creveld 1999, 355). Economic citizenship emerged from the Depression and decolonization as a promise of full employment in the First World and economic development in the Third. Today, it is in decline, displaced by the historic policy renegotiations of the 1970s conducted by capital, the state, and their intellectual servants in economics that redistributed income back to bourgeoisies. Or put another way, economic citizenship is available only to corporations, via tax breaks and other welfare subsidies. Cultural citizenship concerns the maintenance and development of cultural lineage through education, custom, language, and religion and the positive acknowledgment of difference in and by the mainstream. This discourse developed in response to the great waves of cross-class migration of the past fifty years and an increasingly mobile middle-class cultureindustry workforce that has been generated by a new http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

Introducing... Cultural Citizenship

Social Text, Volume 19 (4 69) – Dec 1, 2001

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2001 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
D.O.I.
10.1215/01642472-19-4_69-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

the eighteenth century, though it remains unevenly spread across the globe. Economic citizenship covers employment, health, and retirement security through the redistribution of capitalist gains and the use of the state as an agent of investment. In the words of Australia’s prime minister during World War II, John Curtin, “government should be the agency whereby the masses should be lifted up” (quoted in Van Creveld 1999, 355). Economic citizenship emerged from the Depression and decolonization as a promise of full employment in the First World and economic development in the Third. Today, it is in decline, displaced by the historic policy renegotiations of the 1970s conducted by capital, the state, and their intellectual servants in economics that redistributed income back to bourgeoisies. Or put another way, economic citizenship is available only to corporations, via tax breaks and other welfare subsidies. Cultural citizenship concerns the maintenance and development of cultural lineage through education, custom, language, and religion and the positive acknowledgment of difference in and by the mainstream. This discourse developed in response to the great waves of cross-class migration of the past fifty years and an increasingly mobile middle-class cultureindustry workforce that has been generated by a new

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2001

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