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Internet Access in Africa: A Critical Review of Public Policy Issues

Internet Access in Africa: A Critical Review of Public Policy Issues McCormick: Internet Access in Africa multiple international links. While this state of affairs can be remedied through appropriate telecommunications policy reform, the current situation undoubtedly works against efforts at regional integration and ensures that the continent as a whole continues to suffer from a dearth of Internet accessibility. Structural Constraints The various issues or problems, common to most African states, which limit the use and thus the value of the Internet, can be analyzed in the context of structural constraints. Structural constraints are societal obstacles that restrict the opportunities of a critical number of individuals to participate fully and equitably in the development process and to share in the benefits of a given social system. Structural constraints can be divided into first and second-order constraints. First-order constraints concern relatively fixed resources, such as land size, the alteration of which implies major transformational social policies affecting the status quo and the power structure because they imply redistribution of resources among social groups. Second-order constraints are essentially reforms, which are intended to overcome some of the consequences of first-order constraints without forcibly addressing the underlying foundation of inequitable social arrangements. They represent other societal resources that are generally lacking, particularly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East Duke University Press

Internet Access in Africa: A Critical Review of Public Policy Issues

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1089-201X
eISSN
1548-226X
DOI
10.1215/1089201X-22-1-2-140
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

McCormick: Internet Access in Africa multiple international links. While this state of affairs can be remedied through appropriate telecommunications policy reform, the current situation undoubtedly works against efforts at regional integration and ensures that the continent as a whole continues to suffer from a dearth of Internet accessibility. Structural Constraints The various issues or problems, common to most African states, which limit the use and thus the value of the Internet, can be analyzed in the context of structural constraints. Structural constraints are societal obstacles that restrict the opportunities of a critical number of individuals to participate fully and equitably in the development process and to share in the benefits of a given social system. Structural constraints can be divided into first and second-order constraints. First-order constraints concern relatively fixed resources, such as land size, the alteration of which implies major transformational social policies affecting the status quo and the power structure because they imply redistribution of resources among social groups. Second-order constraints are essentially reforms, which are intended to overcome some of the consequences of first-order constraints without forcibly addressing the underlying foundation of inequitable social arrangements. They represent other societal resources that are generally lacking, particularly

Journal

Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle EastDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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