Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

How Milton Works

How Milton Works MLQ ❙ September 2002 In How Milton Works Fish brings these views to bear with relentless determination, identifying certain presuppositions and beliefs of Milton’s and explaining how and why they shape his works in a threefold way: thematically, epistemologically, and interpretively. That is to say, Milton’s own beliefs inform, impel, and issue forth from certain characters, for example, the Lady in Comus, the Son and Abdiel in Paradise Lost, and the Christ of Paradise Regained. These characters provide what may be called “the testimony of truth”— they testify to the true beliefs inscribed in themselves, beliefs that they uphold despite the adversities that they undergo. For them, faith, patience, and fortitude are paramount virtues. In their clear and fixed vision, and in their absolute determination to separate good from evil, these characters resist and overcome all challenges to their integrity and stability. Like a siege, these challenges, dramatized in many of Milton’s poems, include complex diversions, sophisticated distractions, and seductive blandishments nearly kaleidoscopic in their permutations. In this climate of instability, insecurity, uncertainty, and relativism, false presuppositions and beliefs may overshadow and obscure true ones. Milton’s genius enables him to portray the full range of such threats, temptations, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Modern Language Quarterly: A Journal of Literary History Duke University Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/how-milton-works-7JW5yaG4Jd
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by University of Washington
ISSN
0026-7929
eISSN
1527-1943
DOI
10.1215/00267929-63-3-383
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

MLQ ❙ September 2002 In How Milton Works Fish brings these views to bear with relentless determination, identifying certain presuppositions and beliefs of Milton’s and explaining how and why they shape his works in a threefold way: thematically, epistemologically, and interpretively. That is to say, Milton’s own beliefs inform, impel, and issue forth from certain characters, for example, the Lady in Comus, the Son and Abdiel in Paradise Lost, and the Christ of Paradise Regained. These characters provide what may be called “the testimony of truth”— they testify to the true beliefs inscribed in themselves, beliefs that they uphold despite the adversities that they undergo. For them, faith, patience, and fortitude are paramount virtues. In their clear and fixed vision, and in their absolute determination to separate good from evil, these characters resist and overcome all challenges to their integrity and stability. Like a siege, these challenges, dramatized in many of Milton’s poems, include complex diversions, sophisticated distractions, and seductive blandishments nearly kaleidoscopic in their permutations. In this climate of instability, insecurity, uncertainty, and relativism, false presuppositions and beliefs may overshadow and obscure true ones. Milton’s genius enables him to portray the full range of such threats, temptations,

Journal

Modern Language Quarterly: A Journal of Literary HistoryDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.