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House and Homeland: EXAMINING SENTIMENTS ABOUT AND CLAIMS TO JERUSALEM AND ITS HOUSES

House and Homeland: EXAMINING SENTIMENTS ABOUT AND CLAIMS TO JERUSALEM AND ITS HOUSES Social Text 75, Vol. 21, No. 2, Summer 2003. Copyright © 2003 by Duke University Press. Amahl Bishara approximately one week after demonstrations that would become the first Intifada began, Sharon invited dozens of friends to celebrate the first night of Hanukkah in his new apartment. Mayor Teddy Kollek turned down the invitation, calling Sharon’s decision to purchase in the Old City a provocation and writing in a letter to Sharon, “I believe wholly in our historical right over Jerusalem. Because of this, it is our duty to act with restraint and common sense.”3 Many news articles following the ensuing controversy noted that Sharon’s move would be seen as particularly disrespectful because he was “the prime architect of Israel’s 1982 Lebanon invasion,”4 and thus, to those who knew the subtext of that tag, held responsible for the massacres at the Sabra and Shatila refugee camps. As an Arab student told reporters, “It’s not just a Jew living in an Arab area. Sharon is hated by the Arabs.”5 Sharon himself said that he had a clear right to live anywhere in Israel that he wanted to live, asserting an even Israeli sovereignty over what he considered state territory. He http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

House and Homeland: EXAMINING SENTIMENTS ABOUT AND CLAIMS TO JERUSALEM AND ITS HOUSES

Social Text , Volume 21 (2 75) – Jun 1, 2003

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
DOI
10.1215/01642472-21-2_75-141
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Social Text 75, Vol. 21, No. 2, Summer 2003. Copyright © 2003 by Duke University Press. Amahl Bishara approximately one week after demonstrations that would become the first Intifada began, Sharon invited dozens of friends to celebrate the first night of Hanukkah in his new apartment. Mayor Teddy Kollek turned down the invitation, calling Sharon’s decision to purchase in the Old City a provocation and writing in a letter to Sharon, “I believe wholly in our historical right over Jerusalem. Because of this, it is our duty to act with restraint and common sense.”3 Many news articles following the ensuing controversy noted that Sharon’s move would be seen as particularly disrespectful because he was “the prime architect of Israel’s 1982 Lebanon invasion,”4 and thus, to those who knew the subtext of that tag, held responsible for the massacres at the Sabra and Shatila refugee camps. As an Arab student told reporters, “It’s not just a Jew living in an Arab area. Sharon is hated by the Arabs.”5 Sharon himself said that he had a clear right to live anywhere in Israel that he wanted to live, asserting an even Israeli sovereignty over what he considered state territory. He

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2003

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