Homo on the Range: MOBILE AND GLOBAL SEXUALITIES

Homo on the Range: MOBILE AND GLOBAL SEXUALITIES Jigna Desai Exposing many discrepancies, Deepa Mehta’s film Fire provoked conflict in India in 1998 as Hindu nationalist Shiv Sena members not only attacked and closed theaters but also repeatedly condemned and attempted to communalize the film for its “deviancy.” These events surrounding the film are part of the postcolonial nation-state’s complex histories and power relations. I suggest that Fire illuminates how contemporary postcolonial and transnational cultural discourses articulate racialized, classed, sexualized, religious, and gendered forms of social regulation and normalization. This essay interrogates the various transnational, diasporic, and national discourses surrounding Deepa Mehta’s Fire, with specific attention to how normativities and identities are mobilized with the circulation of the film. I begin with its Western reception and trace through the Shiv Sena attacks, Deepa Mehta’s defenses, and finally, lesbian and diasporic responses. The conclusion locates Fire within diasporic film production and also addresses how these responses and the distribution of the film raise questions regarding the context and the reception of such “diasporic” films within globalization. Overall, I argue that the resultant discourses of normativity, like the film itself, expose negotiations not only between the subject and the nation-state but also between the politics and economics of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Text Duke University Press

Homo on the Range: MOBILE AND GLOBAL SEXUALITIES

Social Text , Volume 20 (4 73) – Dec 1, 2002

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Publisher
Duke Univ Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0164-2472
eISSN
1527-1951
D.O.I.
10.1215/01642472-20-4_73-65
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Jigna Desai Exposing many discrepancies, Deepa Mehta’s film Fire provoked conflict in India in 1998 as Hindu nationalist Shiv Sena members not only attacked and closed theaters but also repeatedly condemned and attempted to communalize the film for its “deviancy.” These events surrounding the film are part of the postcolonial nation-state’s complex histories and power relations. I suggest that Fire illuminates how contemporary postcolonial and transnational cultural discourses articulate racialized, classed, sexualized, religious, and gendered forms of social regulation and normalization. This essay interrogates the various transnational, diasporic, and national discourses surrounding Deepa Mehta’s Fire, with specific attention to how normativities and identities are mobilized with the circulation of the film. I begin with its Western reception and trace through the Shiv Sena attacks, Deepa Mehta’s defenses, and finally, lesbian and diasporic responses. The conclusion locates Fire within diasporic film production and also addresses how these responses and the distribution of the film raise questions regarding the context and the reception of such “diasporic” films within globalization. Overall, I argue that the resultant discourses of normativity, like the film itself, expose negotiations not only between the subject and the nation-state but also between the politics and economics of

Journal

Social TextDuke University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2002

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