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Hillbilly Hellraisers: Federal Power and Populist Defiance in the Ozarks by J. Blake Perkins

Hillbilly Hellraisers: Federal Power and Populist Defiance in the Ozarks by J. Blake Perkins Hillbilly Hellraisers: Federal Power and Populist Deance in the Ozarks J. Blake Perkins Urbana: University of Illinois Press, ix +  pp., $. (cloth); $. (paper) J. Blake Perkins brings impressive research and a lively narrative to bear in his challenge to scholars such as Bethany Moreton (To Serve God and Walmart, Harvard University Press, ) and Darren Dochuk (From Bible Belt to Sun Belt, W.W. Norton, ) who have portrayed late twentieth-century rural people’s antimodernist and antigovernment ideologies as a static feature of southern rural culture since the nineteenth century. Focus- ing on his native Arkansas Ozarks, Perkins explains that while these principles among rural southern whites enjoy a long history, their motivations and undercurrents have remained anything but static since the populist insurgency of the s. The faith poor Ozarkers placed in the federal government to create economic opportunities for rural folks in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, he argues, eroded over time as local elites tasked to administer the programs of a largely decentralized federal state enforced policies in ways that maintained the local status quo and thus their own politi- cal and economic positions. These circumstances, Perkins concludes, led to intense resis- tance http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Labor Duke University Press

Hillbilly Hellraisers: Federal Power and Populist Defiance in the Ozarks by J. Blake Perkins

Labor , Volume 16 (1) – Mar 1, 2019

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Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Labor and Working-Class History Association
ISSN
1547-6715
eISSN
1558-1454
DOI
10.1215/15476715-7269482
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hillbilly Hellraisers: Federal Power and Populist Deance in the Ozarks J. Blake Perkins Urbana: University of Illinois Press, ix +  pp., $. (cloth); $. (paper) J. Blake Perkins brings impressive research and a lively narrative to bear in his challenge to scholars such as Bethany Moreton (To Serve God and Walmart, Harvard University Press, ) and Darren Dochuk (From Bible Belt to Sun Belt, W.W. Norton, ) who have portrayed late twentieth-century rural people’s antimodernist and antigovernment ideologies as a static feature of southern rural culture since the nineteenth century. Focus- ing on his native Arkansas Ozarks, Perkins explains that while these principles among rural southern whites enjoy a long history, their motivations and undercurrents have remained anything but static since the populist insurgency of the s. The faith poor Ozarkers placed in the federal government to create economic opportunities for rural folks in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, he argues, eroded over time as local elites tasked to administer the programs of a largely decentralized federal state enforced policies in ways that maintained the local status quo and thus their own politi- cal and economic positions. These circumstances, Perkins concludes, led to intense resis- tance

Journal

LaborDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2019

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