Heya TV: A Feminist Counterpublic for Arab Women?

Heya TV: A Feminist Counterpublic for Arab Women? Dinaatar he changing media landscape in the Arab world at the beginning of the twenty-fir century is said to be creating new social and power dynamics in the region.1 New forms of media, particularly transnational satellite broadcaing and the Internet, are providing new spaces for diverse and critical views of conteorary life in the region and putting forward diverse role models from across the political, social, economic, and religious spectrum, as well as expressing diverse opinions on issues pertaining to everyday life. In these new communicative spaces, not only is the number of women working in and represented in media visibly increasing, but public discussions about so-far taboo subjects concerning women, such as domeic violence, Islamic law, and honor killing, are also subantially rising. Though the changing media landscape in the Arab world has attracted attention inside and outside the region, particularly since Al-Jazeera was thru into the international spotlight with its reporting of the po–September 11, 2001, U.S.-led war on terror, it is ill rare to see analyses of the altered landscape for public communication that regard the changing climate for the eowerment of women and that take into consideration the social, cultural, and political dynamics operating http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East Duke University Press

Heya TV: A Feminist Counterpublic for Arab Women?

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
© 2007 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1089-201X
eISSN
1089-201X
DOI
10.1215/1089201x-2007-030
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dinaatar he changing media landscape in the Arab world at the beginning of the twenty-fir century is said to be creating new social and power dynamics in the region.1 New forms of media, particularly transnational satellite broadcaing and the Internet, are providing new spaces for diverse and critical views of conteorary life in the region and putting forward diverse role models from across the political, social, economic, and religious spectrum, as well as expressing diverse opinions on issues pertaining to everyday life. In these new communicative spaces, not only is the number of women working in and represented in media visibly increasing, but public discussions about so-far taboo subjects concerning women, such as domeic violence, Islamic law, and honor killing, are also subantially rising. Though the changing media landscape in the Arab world has attracted attention inside and outside the region, particularly since Al-Jazeera was thru into the international spotlight with its reporting of the po–September 11, 2001, U.S.-led war on terror, it is ill rare to see analyses of the altered landscape for public communication that regard the changing climate for the eowerment of women and that take into consideration the social, cultural, and political dynamics operating

Journal

Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle EastDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2007

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