Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Harmony and the Balance: An Intellectual History of Seventeenth-Century English Economic Thought

Harmony and the Balance: An Intellectual History of Seventeenth-Century English Economic Thought Harmony and the Balance: An Intellectual History of Seventeenth-Century English Economic Thought. By Andrea Finkelstein. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000. 364 pp. $49.50. Andrea Finkelstein’s study of seventeenth-century English economic thinking and writing is an intervention into the age-old debate of what was new and old in the economic discourse of this disruptive and revolutionary century. As is well known, authors like E. A. Johnson, William Grampp, Richard Wiles, Terence Hutchison—and, for that matter, the author of this review (although Finkelstein does not yet seem to have read my Mercantilism: The Shaping of an Economic Language, which will, I am afraid to say, not meet with her approval)—have argued that the seventeenth century in England saw the rise of an economics that eventually would turn into the Smithian synthesis of the late eighteenth century. Finkelstein’s position, as I understand it, is to say that such an orthodoxy does not provide an accurate description either of the historical process or of the literature in question. The economics of Thomas Mun, Edward Misselden, Josiah Child, and even Nicholas Barbon and Charles Davenant was something quite different in kind. Rather, it belonged to an older age of bullionist illusions, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Political Economy Duke University Press

Harmony and the Balance: An Intellectual History of Seventeenth-Century English Economic Thought

History of Political Economy , Volume 34 (1) – Mar 1, 2002

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/harmony-and-the-balance-an-intellectual-history-of-seventeenth-century-XB91Axzixg
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0018-2702
eISSN
1527-1919
DOI
10.1215/00182702-34-1-286
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Harmony and the Balance: An Intellectual History of Seventeenth-Century English Economic Thought. By Andrea Finkelstein. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000. 364 pp. $49.50. Andrea Finkelstein’s study of seventeenth-century English economic thinking and writing is an intervention into the age-old debate of what was new and old in the economic discourse of this disruptive and revolutionary century. As is well known, authors like E. A. Johnson, William Grampp, Richard Wiles, Terence Hutchison—and, for that matter, the author of this review (although Finkelstein does not yet seem to have read my Mercantilism: The Shaping of an Economic Language, which will, I am afraid to say, not meet with her approval)—have argued that the seventeenth century in England saw the rise of an economics that eventually would turn into the Smithian synthesis of the late eighteenth century. Finkelstein’s position, as I understand it, is to say that such an orthodoxy does not provide an accurate description either of the historical process or of the literature in question. The economics of Thomas Mun, Edward Misselden, Josiah Child, and even Nicholas Barbon and Charles Davenant was something quite different in kind. Rather, it belonged to an older age of bullionist illusions,

Journal

History of Political EconomyDuke University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.